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14

The debatable: Kabbalistic sources about beards, or about spiritually-destructive forces involved in removing a beard. Much ink has been spilled over how much facial hair was worn by the kabbalist Rabbi Menachem Azariah of Fano. Cutting your beard means you're trying to look like a non-Jew. Chasam Sofer vehemently opposes this argument, observing that in ...


10

R Shlomo Aviner, in Shut She'elat Shlomo, mentions 4 reasons, which are brought here in short: The gmara in Shabbat 152a, says that the splendor of man's face is the beard הדרת פנים זקן. That's the natural and whole looks of the Israeli man, as R Yehonatan Aibeshitz mentions in Ya'art Dvash, part A. The daily shaving is bothersome and causes bitul torah (...


5

There is an old Kabbalistic idea discussed here to place them inside a Sefer! Many Poskim have decried this practice, including R' Ovadia Yosef who is quoted in Kitzur Shulchan Aruch Yalkut Yosef 153:17: וכל שכן שאסור להצניע בתוך ספרי קודש שערות הזקן


5

I assume that most people, besides Jews, also had beards, since it is a natural phenomenon that male humans have beards. At some point in time it became common for many men to shave them, and as mentioned by @Danny Schoemann, this was inconvenient for most Jews, and is still frowned upon by many for halachic reasons, so they are still more prevalent in ...


4

The halachos that you are quoting are based on the sefer Hadras Ponim - Zokon chapter 9. His main argument, or that of his sources, is that depilatory paste would violate both giluach (shaving) and hashchasa (destruction) of the hair. The destruction part is obvious; his main point is that the depilatory is called shaving and you don't need a cutting ...


4

According to Shemirat Shabbat K'Hilchato as cited here, there is a leniency regarding oil, which is how Wikipedia describes this product: Regarding applying hair cream on Shabbat, Shemirat Shabbat Kehilkhatah writes that one may be lenient and apply hair oil, but only in small quantities so that one should not come to squeeze it out of the hair. ...


3

To answer the title but not the body of your question, the Raddak who lived 1160–1235 in Narbonne, Provence, mentions that in his times in the lands where he lived the minhag was to not keep a beard. See Samuel 2 10 5. In fact his words there are apologetically trying to explain why in Dovid's times, when everyone had beards, it was embarrassing not to have ...


3

The Torah commands us (Vayikra 19:27) not to use a razor on one's beard. לֹא תַקִּפוּ פְּאַת רֹאשְׁכֶם וְלֹא תַשְׁחִית אֵת פְּאַת זְקָנֶךָ: ‏ As a result, Jews can trim their beards but not shave them, as documented in Shulchan Aruch יורה דעה in סימן קפא - אסור גלוח הפאות י: אֵינוֹ חַיָּב עַל הַשְׁחָתַת פְּאַת הַזָּקָן אֶלָּא בְּתַעַר, אֲבָל ...


3

On this page you can download the picture where it brings all the opinions with pictures as to where exactly those five points are.


2

I'd say there's no problem because you can't pick the connected hair. Borrer is when you pick the Psolet (or what you don't want) out of the food (what you do want). It's like picking a shoe that happens to be in the middle of a row of other shoes that are nailed to the floor. A more Talmudic could-be-proof, is from Mishna Beitza 23a: רבי יהודה אומר אין ...


2

the Meam Loez in Bereishis says the lion, as king of the animals, was given a beard to give him a majestic look. Likewise we can say for man who is the crown glory of creation and the one God chose for His service. So according to this, it is proper for all men to have beards so it probably started from the first man (Adam) and was later contested by those ...


2

The question actually involves whether the laser is considered a "blade" that cuts the hair or a "fire" that burns the hair off. However, the gemoro in nazir talks about the hashchasa (destruction) of the beard as being forbidden which would mean that the use of the laser is similar to the cutting of the hair by a razor. Note that even a razor is not "...


1

In my experience, different communities have different practices with regard to shaving. (Note that when I talk about "shaving" in this answer, I mean cutting the beard with a permitted shaving device. Not a straight razor which is forbidden.) In general, Hasidic Jews (including teenagers) tend not to shave at all. My understanding is that this is for ...


1

See this article . My inference from this is that considering that there was a debate regarding shaving in general, plus even for those opinions that prohibit shaving, there's a debate if that means only the beard, there are leniencies to rely upon regarding shaving your neck. As there is no consensus, from what I can tell, CYLOR. If you DO shave your neck,...


1

If I were to break down this question to its bare essentials, I would ask: Does the rabbi make the Jew, or does the Jew make the rabbi? In other words, if we see our life as a journey in which we try to move spiritually upon our current plane and attempt to raise ourselves to new levels, can it be that the rabbi who started us on our path is the one with ...


1

Almost no traditional chassidim trim at all. On a different note, the chafets chayim wrote a one volume piece called Tifferes Adam where he suggests in the first chapter to follow the kabbalistic practice of not trimming one's beard at all. Its not on hebrew books but its printed in the standard kol kisvei. This is a point besides his view of shaving.



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