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11

I do not have the precise location but I was taught that the Yalkut Yoseph brings down eight answers/considerations to this question. Here are some highlights: According to Rashi the milk was served first which is entirely permissable. According to the Maharal, Avraham only fulfilled the positive commandments while the Gra brings opinions that he wasn't ...


8

Mishne Berurah (Biur Halacha 216:2 s.v. haMusk) writes that one should not deliberately smell nonkosher food out of concern that they may be tempted to eat it. He reiterates his position in regards to smelling Chametz on Pesach which is also assur bahana'ah and all year long people eat it that one may not smell it on Pesach. However, closing one's nose is ...


7

Babylonian Talmud, Hullin, 116a: עוף איכא בינייהו ר' עקיבא סבר חיה ועוף אינן מן התורה הא מדרבנן אסירי ור' יוסי הגלילי סבר עוף אפילו מדרבנן נמי לא אסיר תניא נמי הכי במקומו של רבי אליעזר היו כורתין עצים לעשות פחמין לעשות ברזל במקומו של רבי יוסי הגלילי היו אוכלין בשר עוף בחלב לוי איקלע לבי יוסף רישבא אייתו לקמיה רישא דטיוסא בחלבא ולא אמר להו ולא מידי כי אתא ...


7

I sent an email to the OU (kosherq@ou.org) about this issue and received the following response: No, one cannot assume that these products are DE, as some companies are not concerned about allergen and will not write a dairy warning. They may still contain actual dairy. [emphasis mine] If a product lists dairy ingredients on the ingredient panel, it ...


6

Your first question should be asked of somone who is an expert in animal slaughter such as the OU or the STAR-K (Baltimore Vaad Hakashrus) who can tell you if the 'humane' practices required by the FDA ensure that the meat is not 'living' when it is being cut up originally. It could be a matter of how long after the slaughter they wait to actually cut it ...


6

Only one refrigerator is needed in any Kosher kitchen. Meat and Dairy can be stored in the same refrigerator. See also here.


6

Let's assume the people eating it are all non-Jews. At that point the only problems (that I can think of) are: cooking meat and milk together, and benefiting from meat-and-milk-cooked-together. If you're just doing the dessert, cleanup, or setup, I can't see that as tangible benefit from the main course. (Feeding it to your dog when you would otherwise ...


5

This is most certainly "a thing": Shopping Bag One should preferably not put meat and dairy foods in one shopping bag. Meat and dairy foods may drip on one another. The wrappers of packaged meats may be fatty and touch other foods. Cottage cheese and yogurt containers may open and spill. (The Laws of Kashurs, Rabbi Binyomin Forst, page 361) I have ...


5

I think the prohibitions on cooking or deriving benefit would not apply at all when either the meat or the milk comes from a non kosher species of animal (e.g. if the meat was pork), which might be the case here. See Milk and Meat of Non-Kosher Animal Species .


5

From Halachically Speaking by Rabbi Moishe Dovid Lebovits The Rama says that the minhag is to have separate salt utensils for meat and for dairy. The reason is that some food particles remain when the food is dipped into the salt, and one may inadvertently mix milk and meat.The poskim say that this halacha applied in the times when salt was ...


4

Maarechet Hashulchan - it has the Shulchan Aruch and Rema, plus summaries of the Shach and Taz. There's a volume for taaruvot, one for melicha, and one for basar v'chalav. (Also other volumes, but those are the ones you asked about).


4

Dr. Haym Soloveitchik notes this anomaly (that really there's no need to have separate dishware for cold foods) in the beginning of his famous essay, Rupture and Reconstruction (second paragraph): "The simple fact is that the traditional Jewish kitchen, transmitted from mother to daughter over generations, has been immeasurably and unrecognizably amplified ...


4

See the באר היטב in Shulchan Aruch Orach Chaim 186, s.q. 8: עד שיתעכל. ושיעור עיכול בשאכילה מועטת הוא כדי הילוך ד' מילין והוא שעה וחומש וכת' המ"א נ"ל דהאי עיכול תחלת עיכול הוא דסוף עיכול הוי' עכ"פ ו' שעות Until [the food] is digested. The measure for digestion for small eating is the time it takes to walk 4 mil, and that is one and one fifth hours. ...


4

From the Star-K: If one ate pareve food that was cooked in a fleishig pot, one is not required to wait six hours before eating dairy. However, one may not eat this food together with dairy or reheat it in a dairy pot. For example, if one cooked spaghetti in a fleishig pot he may eat cheese immediately after finishing the spaghetti. However, he may not ...


4

The Malbim explains that he created a calf using Sefer Yetzirah which can be eaten with milk. http://hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=40102&st=&pgnum=168


4

The Kaf Hachayim on Yore Deah 108:70 and Darkei Teshuva 108:102 conclude that one may not smell those things that are Assur Behana'ah, but one may smell things that are only Assur Ba'achilah.


4

First of all, as most readers are probably aware, customs vary regarding exactly how long to wait between meat and dairy, and there are indeed customs that differentiate between actual meat and poultry in this regard. However, I believe that the more accepted custom is to wait the same amount of time after meat or poultry. Like in all matters of halakha, ...


3

The Torah's prohibition: Don't cook mammal meat in mammal milk. To avoid confusion, the rabbis of the Talmud made the general rule: Don't cook any meat in mammal milk. So the simple answer is -- "because the rabbis didn't ban it." Presumably they were concerned that chicken-in-milk would get confused with beef-in-milk, but didn't feel that eggs ...


3

Rav Betzalel ben Shlomo from Slutzk (1640-1691) in his sefer עמודיה שבעה here says: An animal which is created using the Sefer Yetzirah, since it was not produced by real flesh and blood parents it is not called flesh and blood at all, but rather it is considered merely air. Therefore, it is not governed by any of the restrictions which apply to normal ...


3

Regarding your main question: My question is: If the Geonic tradition is clear on this point, why did some Rishonim require one to wait no matter what? When there was a shift from one era to another, they were accompanied by major shifts in the world as well. One of the main differences between Geonim and Rishonim is the shift towards logical ...


3

The Chochmas Adam is incredibly well-written.


3

In the Shulchan Aruch it was generally assumed that knives had some amount of residue on them, so the answer would be a simple "no." I know rabbis who you'd consider "modern Orthodox" who feel this still applies today -- if you look carefully at the serrations -- so the answer would still be "no." I know other rabbis who you'd consider "ultra-Orthodox" who ...


3

There is a limit as to how much information the kosher manufacturers are interested in displaying on their products and a limit to what the average kosher consumer will appreciate and understand. Many kosher products, particularly national brands, want to appeal to the kosher conscious consumer but don't want to make the kashrus information too obvious ...


2

While you should check with your own local authority, this site (the Star K) makes the following two statements from which you could draw an inference: a. Q: There are many varieties of glass on the market. Do arcoroc, duralex, pyrex, corelle and crystal have the halachic status of glass? A: Yes, they do. b. Q: Can other glass dishes, such as salad bowls ...


2

Ask explained on Chabad.org, there are multiple rationales provided for the mitzwah of separating meat and milk, which is ultimately regarded as a hoq (Divine decree): Some argue that it is cruel to cook a baby in the very milk that was intended to nourish it Others suggest that the reason for this mitzvah is health related. Maimonides asserts ...


2

Source for it being an issue: Shulchan Aruch Yoreh Deah Siman 105:3 in the Rema, where he discussed pouring oil onto a candle made out of non-kosher fats. Both the Shach and the Taz discuss this idea of nitzuk chibur (pouring creates a connection).


2

Your question pretty much describes the Kur HaMivchan to a tee: Bassar B'Chalav Taaruvot Melicha


2

The Ramban understands that Avraham knew they were angels (Ramban 18:3 s.v. אד-ני אם). If so, this would make it OK to serve them milk and meat. This would also explain why he was OK serving milk and meat but not serving something impure (see Rashi about not serving the dough) because angels are holy (refered to as kedoshim) and holiness is incompatible ...


2

I asked my LOR and he showed me the mishnah in trumos (Perek 5 Mishnah 8) which is the original source of the machlokes. If 1 piece of chulin falls into a 100 pieces of chulin, it is batel. If a second piece of trumah falls in, then there is a machlokes as to whether it was now considered 2 in a 100 (1 in 50) and asur or 1 in 101 and batel again. This ...


2

The art scroll gemoro (104b English page 3) says that the gemoro is not saying that "Rabbi Yosi is the Tanna Kama", it is saying that in effect he is saying the same thing as the Tana Kama, so why is he in the Mishna. Footnote 23 says that the hava amina (you might think) that this particular mishna is saying that the Tanna Kamma contends that Bais Shamai ...



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