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20

Such halachic restrictions fall into two categories: those which we believe were given as part of the Oral Law along with the Torah, and those that were clearly put in place later by the rabbis. The former is not adding, as it was part of the given word. E.g. Deuteronomy 12:21, to eat non-sacrificial meat, just slaughter it "in the manner I have ...


16

Excellent question. The answer is that the Rabbis themselves are invested by the Torah with the duty to protect the basic halacha - see for example Deuteronomy 17:8-11, where it basically states that we are Scripturally bound to comply with the rulings of the Sanhedrin. Furthermore see Pirkei Avos 1:1, which states, "... make a protective fence for the ...


9

The mitzvos of Purim and Chanuka definitely fit the bill for the violation of lo sosifu according to the Ramban (vaeschanan 4:2). More specifically, the Yerushalmi quotes a different pasuk- These are the mitzvos that Hashem commanded Moshe. Lo sosifu refers to adding in general, but the former pasuk forbids adding even through prophecy. Both the Bavli ...


8

In order for the Torah Shebal Peh to be "added" to the Torah it would be necessary to conclude from independent evidence that it wasn't part of the Torah to begin with. To argue that Torah Shebal Peh is not divine because it was "added" is to either argue in a circle or merely beg the question. The verse does not proscribe adding to the "written" Torah but ...


8

The Aruch Hashulchan explains that one could add Hadasim and Aravos because the Torah doesn't say how many Hadasim or Aravos to have, it just used a plural form for "Arvei Nachal" and "Anfei Eitz Avos". Therefore one can add more Hadasim or Aravos for beauty. Though Lubavitch custom is to add Hadasim but not Aravos.


8

There are basically 2 types of additions which are allowed: Those that prevent us from accidentally transgressing - as it says in the first Mishna in Pirkei Avot: Make a fence around the Torah. Those instituted by the Sages and Prophets under the umbrella of " כְּכֹל אֲשֶׁר יוֹרֽוּךָ" - "you shall do whatever they teach you" (Devarim 17:10). Keep in mind ...


5

See Mishnah Berurah 651:59 דכתיב ולקחתם לכם ביום הראשון פרי עץ וגו' משמע אחד ולא שנים וה"ה ללולב דכתיב כפות תמרים חסר וי"ו דהיינו אחד וי"א דעובר בזה גם על בל תוסיף אבל בערבה לא נתן בה תורה קצבה והאי דקי"ל דבעינן שתי ערבות משום דכתיב ערבי נחל היינו דבהכי סגי דמיעוט ערבי שתים אבל טפי ג"כ שפיר דמי וה"ה בהדס דכתיב ענף עץ עבות ג"כ יכול להוסיף כמה שירצה In ...


5

If it's the day immediately after Sukkos (Shemini Atzeres in Israel, Simchas Torah outside it), then there is indeed a problem with eating in the sukkah, in that it resembles "adding to the mitzvah" (although technically it isn't, because there is no intention to perform the mitzvah). The recommended approach in that case is to disqualify it by removing some ...


5

The Verse (Devarim 4:2) states: Ye shall not add unto the word which I command you, neither shall ye diminish from it, that ye may keep the commandments of the LORD your God which I command you. Rashi's Commentary on the Verse says: Verse 2: Do not add. For instance to place five parshiyos in the tefillin, to take five species [of fruit] for ...


5

There are at least four answers to this question: Instead of explaining them, I will provide the relevant citations. Maimonides which has already been cited here. R. Judah Halevi in the Kuzari 3:41. R. Joseph Albo, Sefer ha-Ikkarim 3:14, which is also the view of Maharal (Be'er ha-Golah, beginning). Maharsha to Megillah 14a, as well as R. Chaim ...


5

That statement about quoting something not from one's teacher is taken by Rambam (Hil. Talmud Torah 5:9) to mean that by failing to quote the author, one implies that his teacher made this statement (since it can be generally assumed that whatever a student says comes from his teacher). In other words, the problem isn't saying "Rabbi X said Y" when he never ...


2

See Shabbat 23a where Rav Avia and Rav Nehemiah each pose their own answer, both using proof-texts from the book of Deuteronomy.


1

Read the first 4 paragraphs toRambam's Mishneh Torah. It cites an important verse as the proof that the Torah shebichtav (written) and B'al Peh (Oral) were both given on Mt. Sinai and were both taught by Moses. The remaining paragraphs go through various generations until he explains how the Oral law became written in the form of the Mishnah. Rather than my ...



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