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10

"Bal tashchis" is a prohibition on destroying something for which there is potential use. Destroying something that has no use is not in violation of that prohibition. Because there is no use for separated chala (because, as you note, there's no one around these days who can eat it), one may destroy it. Moreover, one can separate the chala even though it ...


7

See here Rambam (Melachim 6:8) writes that if the tree is causing any type of damage, one may destroy it. While the Kaf Hachaim (YD 116:85) writes that one shouldn't destroy a fruit tree to build an extension, most poskim allow one to (See Rosh, Bava Kama 91b; Aruch Hashulchan ibid; Yabia Omer ibid). R’ Ovadia Yosef (Yabia Omer YD 5:12:5) ...


6

The gemara in Shabbos says (140b) בל תשחית דגופא עדיף Damaging (lit. בל תשחית [lit. destruction]) of one's body is more important [than בל תשחית of food] (translation mine) Seems pretty simple that if overeating is harmful to a person's body (which it is), it should be avoided even at the cost of wasting food.


5

It applies to any productive object that is destroyed for a non-productive purpose. Rambam Melachim 6:10


5

The Mishna in Pesachim 2:1 records a dispute as to how Biur Chametz is to be done. Rabbi Yehuda, comparing the destruction of Chametz to the destruction of invalid Korbanot, rules that Chametz must be destroyed by burning. The Chachamim there argue and rule that any form of destruction (tossing into the sea, or crumbling it into the wind) is acceptable. The ...


4

In Shabbos 129a and 140b, the Gemara points out that "bal tashchis" of one's own body outweighs other kinds. So for your first question, if indeed letting the water run gives you purer water (which is better for you), then indeed this should apply. If it's just to get colder water (which presumably does the same thing for your body as if it were lukewarm), I ...


4

It is only prohibited to cut down trees for no purpose, but what "purpose" includes is hard to define. Rambam Laws of Kings 6:9 deals with your case directly, however: כל אילן סרק מותר לקוץ אותו ואפילו אינו צריך לו. וכן אילן מאכל שהזקין ואינו עושה אלא דבר מועט שאינו ראוי לטרוח בו. מותר לקוץ אותו. It is permissible to cut down any non-fruit bearing ...


3

Kaf Hachayim 445:11 quotes that kabbalistically it is preferable to burn the chometz as it symbolizes the destruction of the Yetzer Harah. The Rashash (Pesachim 21b) suggests, according to one opinion, that eating chometz accomplishes burning it, since the heat of your body is like burning. And אדם כי עץ השדה, a man is like a tree, so you even get the ...


3

The underlying theoretical justification - Pikuach Nefesh, saving lives by preventing attacks - is where it would come from. Whether or not this behavior accomplishes that in this context is another matter. The most interesting aspect of the question is if the victim of the "Price-Tag" attack is decidedly not an aggressor, just happens to be in the same ...


3

Rabbi Binyomin Gruber* told me personally that it is better to throw out food than to overeat. * Best reference to know who he is that I could find, if someone has a better one, please share


3

Destruction of any object or food that is still usable falls under the catagory of Lo Sashchis (Rambam Melachim 6:10) I sometimes leave the bread out until it stales and is no longer edible to the norm of society. Alternatively, I throw it in the garbage inside a bag so that the bread is preserved in its state.


2

Although I am not at all familiar with the video or the controversy,I would suspect that many, or most, people were not upset because it constituted a technical violation of bal tashchis but because they felt it violated the principle of the matter. According to my understanding pretty much any reason to destroy something will override the prohibition of ...


2

I haven't seen the video, but I would imagine that people were upset because there wasn't an absolute need to use actual food for the props - they could have had plastic 'eggs' filled with some yellow liquid, and a cup of water darkened to look like coffee (adding mud might be one way to get a good color for a cup of coffee). In this sense, although the eggs ...


2

The Gemara in Bava Kamma 91b discusses this: אמר רב דיקלא דטען קבא אסור למקצציה מיתיבי כמה יהא בזית ולא יקצצו רובע שאני זיתים דחשיבי א"ר חנינא לא שכיב שיבחת ברי אלא דקץ תאינתא בלא זמנה אמר רבינא ואם היה מעולה בדמים מותר תניא נמי הכי (דברים כ, כ) רק עץ אשר תדע זה אילן מאכל כי לא עץ מאכל הוא זה אילן סרק וכי מאחר שסופו לרבות כל דבר מה ת"ל כי לא עץ מאכל ...


1

This article starts from the point that the Torah Devorim 20:19 prohibits destroying fruit trees during a siege. It goes on to say: The general prohibition against needless destruction, derived from the verse on fruit trees, concerns not destroying directly or indirectly anything that may be of use to people. The Talmudic sage Rabbi Yishmael ...


1

Per Halachafortoday.com Q: In reference to today’s question about baal tashchis vs. achilas gasa- I always have a similar question, how can one throw out food that became unusable due to kabalistic reasons (a peeled onion, food under a bed that someone slept on, a drink left uncovered over night) does the kabbalistic reason overrule baal tashchis ...


1

The laws change by state and many caterers have (or had) deals with charities to pick up the leftovers. As such, you really need to ask. Personally, i have asked a caterer for leftover pineapple boats, which i was happily given. (Dried pineapple is delicious!) To answer specifically: "Is it considered, then, a mitzvah to take these cakes as we know they ...



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