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11

Let's take a step back: the Hebrew calendar uses lunar months of either 29 or 30 days (for 354 days altogether). Now the Bible says that Passover should be in the spring, and if you keep having years of 354 days you'll keep sliding backwards until Passover won't be in the spring anymore, so every so often they'd add a leap month. Sure, other peoples may have ...


8

There is also the halachic opinion of Rav Yehudah, quoted in several places in the Gemara (Berachos 24b, Shabbos 41a, Kesubos 110b-111a) that it is in fact forbidden to move from Bavel to Eretz Yisrael. He bases this on his understanding of Jer. 27:22 ("they shall be brought to Bavel, and there they shall remain until the day I am mindful of them"), plus ...


6

I heard that Malbim discusses this issue. While he holds you can say that it was written at the time of the Churban, he also discusses how it could have been written by David. He raises two issues: What would people have thought about such a mizmor before the churban? What would happen to the mizmor if they did teshuvah and there was no churban? He ...


5

Conditions in Israel at the time were generally worse than they were in Bavel. The Romans empire (especially after it converted to Christianity) treated the Jews much worse than the Persian government did. In Bavel, the Jews were granted a certain amount of autonomy and freedom, which allowed them to study and keep the Torah without persecution.


4

http://www.chabad.org/library/article_cdo/aid/987524/jewish/Why-Babylonian-Names-for-Jewish-Months.htm So why did we begin to use these names? Why didn't we stick with the Biblical practice of referring to months by their number? Nachmanides suggests that this is consistent with Jeremiah's prophecy: "Therefore, behold days are coming, says G‑d, ...


4

I was able to find this PDF which claims that historical evidence gives tangential evidence to the story in Daniel. http://www.biblehistory.net/Meshach_Shadrach_Abed-Nego.pdf He mentions that the names of these three people are found on a 5 sided clay prism from Babylonia, but so far I've only found Christian sites that make reference to this pillar. It ...


3

Reading the Psalm itself, living at the time specified by the question, I would probably think that the Psalm's author was a captive in Babylon. He sat there, in prison, waiting to get back. The psalm itself actually talks about "our captors (שובינו)": "for there our captors asked us for songs, our tormentors demanded songs of joy; they said, “Sing ...


3

From the words of the Malbim on Shas it would be an extention of the Torah law of keeping oneself out of danger. Again from the same Malbim: Because the "chain" must not be broken until they conclude Talmud Bavli. a. According to the Rambam, yes; according to Rashi (quoted in Lechem Mishne), only if there are Yeshivos. b. According to (above) Malbim, ...


2

The following is based on Rabbi Aryeh Kaplan's understanding of the history as presented in his introduction to: The Torah Anthology - Book of Esther (translation of Yalkut Me'am Loez by Rabbi Aryeh Kaplan). It is based in part on Megila 11b-12a. Versions of Yirmiyahu's prophecy: (said in 3331 - 460 BCE) וְהָיְתָה כָּל הָאָרֶץ הַזֹּאת לְחָרְבָּה ...


2

The Maharatz Chajes discusses this in Maamar Torat Nevi'im, ch. 7: וכן ניחא נמי ליישב הא דלא מנו מוני המצות מה שאמרו חז"ל (כתובות קי"א ע"א) העולה מבבל לא"י עובר בעשה שנאמר בבלה יובאו ושמה יהיו עד יום פקדי אותם, והיינו דמצוה זאת היא היפך ממצות התורה שנצטוינו בשעת מתן תורה לרשת את הארץ ולהאחז בה, ואם לא היינו חוטאים היתה עדיין א"י מוחזקת אצלנו, וע"כ מצוה זאת ...


2

The Babylonian calendar wasn't adopted exactly as it was, but the names of the months were. This was recognized by the Sages in the Gemara, Yerushalmi Rosh Hashana 1:2. Why the Jews adopted these Babylonian names is a good question. In fact, it seems like the Jews did have their own ancient names for the months, such as 'Ziv' and 'Bul', which are ...


2

Generally, the list of exiles corresponds with the four empires that Daniel envisioned (Daniel 2:37-43 and chs. 7-11). According to most commentators, they are: Babylonia, Persia/Media, Greece (Alexander the Great and his Hellenistic successors), and Rome and her cultural inheritors. Each of these indeed ruled over the majority of the world's Jews in its ...


2

One thing you have to consider when you discuss the people who were exiled after the desctruction of the first temple is that they were exiled to Bavel. Of all the places they could have gone to, they were exiled to a place where they spoke the language and were able to communicate with other people already there. That had a big impact on a lot of people. ...


1

I've heard that the first scholar to go to Bavel was Rav, sent by Ribbi Yehuda HanNasi. He opened up a yeshiva in Sura for the sake of the general population that resided there at the time, which was uneducated to a certain degree. He created his own talmidim. At little later, Shemuel broke off and started a yeshiva in Naharda'a (which I think may have been ...



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