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14

There is an aggadah in Bavli Sotah 11b that is almost exactly what you're describing. It's in the section that starts with Rav Avira saying that B'nei Yisrael were redeemed from Mitzrayim on account of the righteous women. First they would encourage their husbands in the mitzvah of p'ru ur'vu, then they would stay in their houses while pregnant, and then ...


14

Human breastmilk is 100% kosher once it has left the woman's body (Shulchan Aruch YD 81:7). Furthermore, it is pareve, but shouldn't be cooked with meat to avoid issues of Marat Ayin (ibid. 87:4).


12

As CharlesKoppelman said in the comments above, it is the custom of some Jewish people to prefer surrounding their children with only pure, kosher images, including those of animals. This is, as he said, not universal, nor even extremely common, AFAIK. I suggest you just ask the parents beforehand. They'll be glad to tell you :D Sources for the ...


11

In Be'er Moshe, R' Moshe Stern relates how it was the custom in his home not to allow children to see their reflection in the mirror before their teeth come in or before they begin to speak. In regard to several of these type of (bizarre) customs, he writes: וכל אלו הג׳ מנהגים בכלל מנהג נשים זקינות שעליהם כתב הרשב״א שאל יזלזלו בדבריהן ובמנהגיהם כי בודאי ...


8

Aveilus for the Torah forgotten. Taamei Haminhagim 902


7

It is superstition, which Jewish women likely absorbed from the surrounding culture. I wrote in another answer about upsherin and the Pennsylvania Germans / Dutch, where the Pennsylvania Germans are continuing an old superstition from Europe (and where upsherin is explicitly not practiced by Tannaim/Amoraim). Similarly, R' Menasheh Klein's endorsement of ...


7

A source that the time the child cries at a Bris is an עת רצון is the notes of Rabbi Eliyahu Guttmacher Zatzal on Mesechtas Shabbos 130a. This is mentioned in the Sefer Aderes Eliyahu. He writes שבזמן שהתינוק בוכה מצער המילה, עת רצון היא.


6

Reading about it online, people seem to be saying that it's for aveilus (mourning): either because the baby was taught the entire Torah in the womb (like here), and was then forced to forget it, or because the baby was forced to come into the world (like here).


6

Rav Aharon Yehuda HaLevi Grossman (V'Darashta VChakarta 4:42:7) permitted nursing in a bathroom particularly in a case where doing so would allow for proper modest behavior. Source


6

It comes from Niddah 31b: הרוצה לעשות כל בניו זכרים יבעול וישנה – One who wants to make all his children males should cohabit once and then repeat it. Rashi there explains that this comes in continuation to the previous statement in the Gemora that if the wife emits seed first the child conceived will be a male. By first arousing his wife's desire ...


6

My understanding is that 30 days was considered a rule of thumb for whether we call this a healthy baby that could have lived, but then died; vs. a sign that this pregnancy was never truly viable. Traditionally (for instance Chochmas Adam 161:6), the understanding was that an "eight-month-gestation" baby was born with severe defects and thus never got Shiva,...


5

The Star-K's Rabbi Frankel discusses it. Rav Heinemann shlit”a suggests that there is further reason to be lenient in the case of the diaper with a color-changing stripe. Rav Moshe Feinstein zt”l states that, on Shabbos, one is allowed to wear photo-gray glasses which darken when exposed to sulight, even though walking outside will cause the lens to ...


5

Shmiras Shabbos Khilchasa (quoted by Rabbi Ribiat in his Sefer 39 Melachos) page 154-155 says it is permitted to add to a Ohel on Shabbos and therefore one may place a plastic covering over a stroller on Shabbos, so long the strollers own canopy is open already. He says the regular canopy can be opened as it is attached and then you place the plastic ...


5

The sefer "Viyikare Shemo Beyisroel" (page 84) brings two views on the subject. Some consider combining two names as a completely different name that has no association to either, while others have no problem. He writes that the prevalent custom is like the later opinion. The sources he brings: Bris Avos (8:39). Pe'er Hador (vol. 4 pg. 200). Yabiye Omer (5 ...


5

A few years ago there was a tehilim drive for a sick baby pre-bris and the tehilim name being used was Tinok Ben Aviva until they were eventually able to do a bris. The child's father is an established Rabbi , currently leading this congregation and many congregations used this name worldwide, so I assume this is the accepted practice. Not sure how to handle ...


5

I read from Rav Mutzafi that there is no problem for a child to see his reflection in a mirror. I believe he said that those who discourage a child from seeing his reflection have no source for this "custom".


5

I heard that it was originally a takanah of the Vaad Arba Aratzos to LIMIT the expense of a shalom zachor food by limiting it to Chickpeas (Arbes) that were very inexpensive and beer (the most inexpensive alcohol).


5

The Kaf HaChaim writes in Yoreh Deah siman 116 number 149 "a woman that begins to nurse her son should begin nursing from the left breast first". He writes that his source is the Tzava'as Rebbe Yehudah HaChasid #69 and the sefer Shmiras HaNefesh #17. The sefer Mishnas Yehoshua footnote #18 (on the linked page) mentions that according to the sefer Shmiras ...


5

Sefer Asia - page 244 and page 245 brings different stories quoted by Rabbi Chaim Miller of such situations. Amongst those quoted that urged giving a name prior to a Bris in order to be able to have a name to Daven for were Rabbi Yechezkel Levenstein Zatzal, The Ozorover Rabbi Zatzal, Rabbi Moshe Feinstein Zatzal, Rabbi Eliezer Man Shach Zatzal, and the ...


4

Another explanation is it's a Yiddish/Hebrew pun, referencing to G-d's blessing to multiply Abraham's offspring: "arbeh es zar'acha". Rabbi Joseph Dov Soloveichik's last public event (due to his declining health and mental function) was the wedding of Rabbi Kenneth Brander. Rabbi Brander told his ailing mentor, "G-d willing we'll have you for many more ...


4

This page cites a couple of other reasons: The second word means "remembering" (as in זכור ושמור), because the child will have to start "remembering" the Torah he previously learned in the womb and has now forgotten. (R' Yaakov Emden) Also with the meaning "remembering": it's that he should recall the oath he took at birth (Niddah 30b) to "be a tzaddik and ...


4

The halacha to circumcise and name a newborn baby boy who has died before his bris milah is brought down in the Kitzur Shulchan Aruch at 163:7: An infant who died before he was circumcised -- whether within eight days or afterward -- we circumcise him before burial to remove from him his shame, so that he should not be buried with his foreskin intact, ...


4

Rav Shlomo Ephraim (author of the Kli Yakor on the Torah) writes in עוללות אפרים siman 415 this idea, with regards to the baby crying specifically being an eis ratzon see here in Siman 470


4

See Gemara Baba Kamma 80a מכי אתא רב לבבל רב ושמואל ורב אסי איקלעו לבי שבוע הבן ואמרי לה לבי ישוע הבן. ‏ Tosfot: לבי ישוע הבן. ...ור"ת פי' שנולד שם בן ועל שם שהולד נושע ונמלט ממעי אמו כדכתיב והמליטה זכר (ישעיה סו) נקט לשון ישועה והיו רגילין לעשות סעודה: ‏ Yeshua Haben, according to R"T is a meal before the Brit Mila. See Sde ...


3

Here are some sources (they all deal with R' Moshe Feinstein's תשובה): http://www.daat.ac.il/daat/kitveyet/assia_english/halperin2-1.htm http://www.daat.ac.il/daat/kitveyet/assia_english/tendler-1.htm http://nleresources.com/kiruv-and-chinuch/nle-gemara/the-conjoined-twins-dilemma/ Rabbi Tendler's article also appears in his "Care of the Critically Ill" (...


3

Taame Haminhagim 903 starts off by saying he's going to explain why it's called a shalom zachar and proceeds to cite Tosafos (Bava Kama 80:1 s.v. "L've") as saying that the reason the g'mara there calls a shalom zachar a "salvation of the son" is that he was saved from the womb (citing "וְהִמְלִיטָה זָכָר", from the haftara of Shabas rosh chodesh, related to ...


3

So far, the only source I have seen for not eating in the bathroom is the B'er Heitev (OC 3:2). He extends this law as a kol shekein ("even more so") from talking. I am assuming they are forbidden for the same reason- it is improper. In line with that reasoning is why women did speak in a bathroom- otherwise there could be a breach in modesty. I would ...


3

Ohr Hachayim Noach 6,10 and 7,1 discusses this. It appears that minors can pass on due to parental sins. it was only because of Noach's righteousness that they were saved in his merit (as minors). It is unclear if this is the case only with bnai-Noach or also with Yisroel. Later, he indicates that Noach's children were saved because in Noach's merit they ...


3

Okay, I do not have any Talmud or later sources, but my gut impression upon reading the Psalm is: This Psalm was written by captive Judeans, quite possibly Temple singers, using the emotional energy of their situation to do something artistic, as has been done for a long long time before and since. They did a classic, immortal job of it! It PERFECTLY ...


3

The braitta (Sotah 11b) is suggesting that they provided for them even beyond their initial infancy, to the point where they could be self-sufficient (i.e. "וַתְּחַיֶּיןָ" suggests that "they enabled the boys to live"). Possibly, at that stage of the anti-Hebrew decrees, Pharaoh was only requiring feticide or partial-birth abortion, not outright ...



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