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9

I don't know or care about the Kabbala or red string business. I will also add that Jews absolutely do honorably serve on jury duty in the United States, and believe that because all humans are expected to have systems of justice, it is absolutely allowed -- and required -- to apply whatever judgement (e.g. beyond reasonable doubt) is necessary for that ...


4

Rashi on Sanhedrin 100a seems to interpret it to mean that he died: גל של עצמות. שמת, דאדם שמת נעשה גל של עצמות. A mound of bones. that he died, for a person who died becomes a mound of bones The Maharal in Chiddushei Aggadoth on Shabbath 34a interprets it to mean sudden death: ועשה אותו גל עצמות. פירוש [מיתה פתאמית] וזה נקרא גל של עצמות ...


4

First you need to define what you mean by Evil Eye. More to the point, the Talmud does mention that a wife's tears can have a tragic effect on the husband's well being. E.g.: The Gemara in Kethuboth 62b cites the case of Rav Rechumi was arrived home late for his annual (Erev Yom Kippour) visit. His wife got so worried that she started crying, and he was ...


3

Ayin Hara can be considered as the result of one's flaunting ones good fortune. It can also be considered as the result of an individual having is own judgment reconsidered. “Evil eye” is known as “ayin hara” in Judaism. It is a real force, mentioned many times in the Talmud and Kabbalistic works (e.g. Talmud Brachot 20a, 55b). The concept ...



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