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6

I think the answer is way more simple that that offered in the other answer: The first person to give an Ayin Hara or attempt it was Billam. He had only one functional eye. Therefore we called it Ayin Hara.


5

Ben Ish Hai (Shana Bet Parashat Pinehas sim. 13) actually endorses the Hamsa. A few months ago, I asked HaGaon HaRav Meir Elyiahu Shelit"a this question (question 108 on RabiMeir.com): שמעתי שקדן גדול בהיסטוריה, כי חמסה היא מן התרבות המוסלמית, ולכן החלטתי לתפוס לדעת כי היא, שאסור להשתמש בהם. האם זה נכון He answered: צורת החמסה אכן לקוחה מאגדה ...


4

It would seem the Mishnah Berurah disagrees with Reb Moshe. In Hilchos Kriyas Hatorah (Orach Hachaim 141:6) it is brought that two brothers should not be called up one after the other, and he says that that's even if they are not Makpid. This seems to indicate he thinks Ayin Hara does affect those who do not care.


4

Reb Moshe in the Iggras Moshe (אה''ע חלק ג' סימן כ''ו) says NO. Even though the Gemara (פסחים ק''י ע''ב) says the Heter by Zugos (eating or drinking paired items) non the less Reb Moshe says the same applies to Ayin Hara.


4

Here is an excerpt from Kovetz Minhagim, An Anthology of Chabad Lubavitch customs regarding pregnancy, childbirth, circumcision, redemption of the firstborn, and the birth of girl: It is the custom of chassidim who are careful to conduct their lifestyles according to the practices of old that they conceal their wives' pregnancies until they have ...


3

Ohr Somayach “ask the Rabbi” explains, here is an extract: What happens is the following: One person who has what another person lacks is "careless" and lets the other person see what he has. This causes pain to the other person, and his cry goes up to the Heavenly court. We say "Bli Ayin Hara" (literally "Without the Evil Eye") as a prayer ...


3

The Chida in his Sefer Pnei David says since it is the way of people to close one eye it is called Ayin Hara he only uses one eye!!


3

The Wikipedia page discusses how it pre-dates Islam and seems to have pagan origins, which would be a worse problem. Good luck charms are problematic on their own, but pagan ones are definitely assur.


3

Obviously you won't find any clear proof one way or the other. I'll just mention that the Tzemach Tzedek (OC siman 38) entertains the possibility that this procedure is effective for certain ailments, to the extent that he allows it to be performed on Shabbos (because of the possibility that it might save a life). For a discussion about which people do this ...


2

I know of no source within Kabbalistic texts that state to do this. Specifically when I asked Rav Kaduri ZTz"L about someone who did it in Jerusalem, he said it was ossur as a Kabbalah Maasit. Second to that, the "procedure" that they do to remove the Ayin HaRa and prove that it has been removed is an old stage trick, my wife showed me how it was done. ...


1

The Ben Ish Chai Shanah Beis parshas Pinchas 13 cites from the gemara in Berachos 20a what pesukim to say to save oneself from ayin harah. He then lists other pesukim as well. See there for the lists of pesukim. Lastly, he cites the custom cites earlier by the Chidah to say Chamsah and make a palm shaped wood piece with the letter of Hashem.


1

This custom is much wider than the Jewish world. Most women do not widely publicize their pregnancies until the third month because the rate of, G-d-forbid, miscarriage drops significantly at week 12. By month 5, women start to show, so it becomes nearly impossible to keep it a secret. However, my wife would ream me out my if I ever lied as a response to ...


1

You cannot do a Mitzva for other people, the same way you cannot breathe, eat or go on diet for other people. Why? Because a Mitzva generates a spiritual reward that you will enjoy in the world to come. If you cause other people to do a Mitzva, you get brownie points for that too. Since your children are in existence because of you, you get some credit for ...


1

As Mekubal said it was deemed to be Kabbala Maasit which was Asured by Rav Chaim Vital through the Ari 450 years ago. My cousin asked this question to Rav Yaakov Moshe Hilel, and he said it was Kabala Maasit. Once, I found some in my house and asked my Rav what to do, he said to through it out.



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