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a quote from shaar yichud ch.10 of Chovos Halevavos The foolish and simple person will conceive the Creator in accordance with the literal sense of the metaphor [...] If the scriptures had employed more accurate, truer terminology, then nobody would have understood it except the wise, understanding reader and most of mankind would have ...


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The same question can be asked of G-d smelling (by korbanos), speaking, (and in a similar way knowing, regretting). We first have to discuss what are these things in a conceptual sense. What is eating? You take something in and it gives you energy. So if learning increases your intellectual ability, then learning can be said to be eating because you took in ...


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Let's sidestep the issue of praying in a mosque per se. Suppose a building is built as a church and years later is sold and converted into a municipal office building. Can I pray there? If a building was built to protect an idol, then Jews are prohibited from deriving benefit from the building. Thus there was a responsum that allowed converting a Methodist ...


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Rabbi Simcha Zissel of Kelm writes (forget the exact source) that the yetzer hara for idolatry was never really destroyed, it merely changed form from worship of idols to worship of other things. he says one form it has changed to today is worship of money. see also this by Rabbi Yisacher Frand http://www.torah.org/learning/ravfrand/5757/yisro.html


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The Maharal in Nesivas Olam (Nesiv Hoavoda 12) discusses the issue of Machnisei Rachamim. He is completely in line with the Rambam that it is absolutely Assur to pray to angels. However, he writes that it would be ok to say it as a command rather than a prayer. In our case, this 'prayer' is actually telling them to wait rather than begging or praying to ...


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Never did the Rambam understand this declaration as a "prayer" nor at any time did he deem requests or favors be permissible to ask of mal'akhim ("angels"). In an article written for the monthly newsletter of Makhon Mosheh and Halikhoth `Am Yisra'el - Or HeHalikhoth - by Rabbi Dr. Hhananel Sari (Shevat, 5773), the position of the Rambam from his own ...


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Based on the answer of @Yishai here: the Torah speaks in several places about loving the stranger (e.g. Leviticus 19:33) and helping him (ibid 25:35, Deuteronomy 14:21). A non-Jew who fits this category is called a "ger toshav". Based on the above verses, Rambam (Melachim 10:12) writes that a "ger toshev" has to be treated with the same respect and ...



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