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That would depend on how connected the milk inside the udders is to the cow. Conceptually, a kosher, slaughtered cow with milk in it's udders can be cooked and eaten with that milk de'oraysa, but may be assur midirabannan. That implies we view the milk as still incorporated with the cow. Therefore, if the cow becomes assur, the milk in it's udders is assur ...


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To make the question stronger, the Rambam writes (Hilchos Akum 2:1) that the primary belief of idolaters was/is that G-d is in charge and the idolatry gets its power from Him. So, if we still believe that G-d is the Boss, what's the problem? I once heard an explanation that the problem is that if you have an intermediary, all you will care about is what ...


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I do not yet have sources for this; but, having considered some implications of idolatrous belief, I will pose an answer. Idolatry ("'Avodah Zarah" in Hebrew) stems from the belief that HaShem (the Jewish concept of G-d) is limited and shares power/dominion over Creation with other entities. If this were true, H"V, it would result in neither deity having ...


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Piskei Riaz is explicit that for educational purposes this is permitted (Avodah zarah 3:11). This is besides for the opinion of the Rambam that the prohibition is only when it was made for idolatry (see Sefer HaChinuch neg. 27).


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Presumably the prohibition in question would be "You shall not make for yourself a carved item or any image which is in the heaven above..." (Exodus 20:4). Rambam implies that the prohibition is only in constructing an image in order to worship it. (Sefer Hamitzvos negative commandment #2) Assuming you have no idolatrous intent it ought to be permitted. ...


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The fact that no-one associates the name of the Greek goddess of victory with it's pagan origins is precisely the reason Rabbi Yisroel Belsky told me not to worry about the apparel company named after her. He added there is room to be stringent if you really want to, just don't make yourself or others crazy.


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Just to give some perspective. This question Why isn't it considered idol worship to give respect to the torah? was met with reactions deeming it practically ridiculous to even ask such a thing. Now let's see what Rava says in Makkos 22b 'what fools all these other people are! Who stand up for a Seffer Torah, but don't stand up before a great Rabbi!' ...


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Well, we learn (פסחים כב:) that we have to be in awe of Talmidei Chachomim from an extra word in the Pasuk that commands us to be in awe of Hashem - את ה' א-לקיך תִּירָא לְרַבּוֹת תַּלְמִידֵי חֲכָמִים. ‏ The laws concerning honouring and respecting a Talmid Chacham are very severe - as documented in שלחן ערוך - יורה דעה. Here's some samples: סימן רמב ...


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The second Biur Halachah in the Mishna Berura (1:1), quoting the Sefer HaChinuch, discusses this question. It states clearly that a Jew is prohibited to believe in any power besides G-d. It additionally states that "even if someone admits that Hashem rules everything, but imagines that He gave over running of the world to an angel or star, he is considered ...



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