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14

From this site. "R' Menachem Mendel Kasher in an article in the periodical Sinai refutes many of [Gershom] Scholem's points (used to argue that Zohar was authored by R. Moshe De Leon). He writes: Many statements in the works of the Rishonim refer to Medrashim that we are not aware of. He writes that these are in fact references to the Zohar. ...


6

The traditional view: The Jewish Scripture, i.e. Tanakh, is made of 3 parts. The first part is the "Chumash", the five books of Moses. They were dictated word-by-word from G-d, and Moses wrote them down. (Now most of Deuteronomy is a big speech of Moses, but even so, after the fact that's what he was ordered to transcribe.) The last few verses describe ...


5

According to Midrash Eicha Zuta, it was written by ירמיה (Jeremiah). This is also reflected in the Septuagint (aka LXX aka Targum Shivim), which opens with the line "By Jeremias, in the Captivity." This is probably the oldest tradition. According to Rashi, Midrash Tehillim (aka Midrash Secher Tov), Pesiqta Rabbatti, Ibn Ezra in his introduction to ...


4

The Gemora (Gitin 57b) states that Hashem showed Dovid Hamelech a prophecy of the destruction of the two temples and he composed Tehillim Chapter 137. However the Ibn Ezra (in his introduction to his commentary on Tehillim) writes that some say it was composed at the time of the Babylonian Exile.


4

If you look at the evidence used in that article about Elephantine etc., it is very poor; the assumptions being made seem ridiculous to me. The fact that someone wants you to write to them at Pesach time doesn't mean they don't know what date you will celebrate it. The fact that people weren't keeping the Shabbat day doesn't mean no one knew about it. ...


4

You've brought up a bunch of ideas. Let me try to deal with them singly. The Talmud records a dispute as to whether Moses or Joshua wrote the last eight verses of Deuteronomy (the ones that mention his death). The rest of Deuteronomy was written by Moses: I know of no Jewish source that disputes that, though I'm no expert. Either way, though, Moses knew ...


3

The Encyclopaedia Judaica, cited in the Wikipedia article linked in the comments above, states as follows: Eḥad Mi Yode'a is first found in Haggadot of the 16th century and only in those of the Ashkenazi ritual. Many scholars believed that it originated in Germany in the 15th century. Perles showed its similarity to a popular German pastoral song, "Guter ...


3

Zev Vilnay: Legends of Palestine (1922), later renamed to Legends of the Land of Israel. See here, page 67: http://books.google.com/books?id=VkA6-0-aDdIC&lpg=PP1&pg=PA67#v=onepage&q&f=false


3

According to this page, the author is unknown. However, earlier in the book (fn. 2), he says that it was first printed in Livorno 5543, if that helps you.


2

In the introduction to his Moreh Nevukhei ha-Zman, Nachman Krochmal argues at length for the (Ibn Ezra's) view that this mizmor was composed at the time of the Babylonian exile.


2

In Yeshurin 21 Page 65 Rabbi Ezra Shaivet says that there are those who attribute it to רבי עובדיה בן דוד, however it is still unclear whether this is accurate. He does not indicate who it is that attributes this to the רבי עובדיה בן דוד.


2

Parashath Bilaam is written with stories that Mosha Rabbeinu never experienced, for example the story with the donkey, no one was there but the donkey bilaam and the maloch. Also the sacrifices and such is from the perspective of bilaam and not Mosha Rabbeinu. Therefore, the gamoro in BB is saying that Mosha Rabbeinu did write it even though the perspective ...


2

http://he.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D7%A4%D7%A1%D7%A7%D7%99_%D7%AA%D7%95%D7%A1%D7%A4%D7%95%D7%AA Per Rabbi Yaakov Emden in his Sefer Mishna Lechem Pesachim Chapter 10 it was authored by Rabbi Yaakov ben Asher - the Tur. There are those who attribute it to the Tur's father - the Rosh. The Chida in Shem HaGedolim questions as to what the source is that it was ...


2

The traditional argument is explored and defended at length here and the subsequent links in the series. No one claims that the entirety of the Zohar as we have it was written by Rabbi Shimon bar Yochai (and no one says that he actually wrote as opposed to taught orally any of it). It would seem rather repetitive to restate all the arguments there, but the ...


2

I think you have to put this in context. We're talking about an age where long distance communication was almost non-existent. So while the King had absolute influence over Jerusalem - the further you traveled the less influence he had. So while it's possible that within walking distance of Jerusalem the Torah had all but been forgotten (and this is ...


1

I think maybe only some of the commandments and the details of Torah (especially the punishment for idolatry and what really constitutes idolatry) was forgotten in the absence of the text. However the greater part of the how to do a lot of stuff (as what was a Shabbat violation or the niddah rules) were not forgotten, because it was more cultural than ...


1

Rambam's Eighth Principle (translation by Aish.com): We believe that the entire Torah in our possession was given [to us] by the Almighty through Moshe Rabbeinu, by means of the medium we metaphorically call "speech." No one knows the real nature of this communication except Moshe, to whom it was transmitted. He was like a scribe receiving dictation. He ...


1

Levi Ginsburg in his commentary to the Yerushalmi explains that apparently there were people who claimed that the story of Bilaam was not realy part of the Torah but was added to it from an external source (he brings proof that such a claim existed from other sources in Chazal). Therefore, Chazal wanted to refute this and said that Moshe Rabbeinu wrote this ...


1

Midrash is very subversive. The midrashim now known as "classic" today, and taught by every 3rd grade rebbe, weren't necessarily learned or accepted by all Jews throughout history. Different communities had their own work, whether it was Midrash Hagadol by Yemenite Jews in the Middle Ages, to Midrash Rabbah around the 400-500s C.E, to the Tosedta, written ...



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