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27

My Hagbaha Guidelines Make sure there is an empty chair behind you to sit down on at the end Roll the torah to a seam in the klaf sections. This is not to aid the one performing it, but helps if one pulls the Torah outward with too much force in the process of lifting it up, that a tear will occur on a seam where it can be repaired instead in the middle ...


13

I heard Rabbi Berel Wein discussing that Rashi's headcovering (in the animated film made by Rabbi Wein) is red, maroon, and/or brown. The historical research shows those were men's colors for Jews in Rashi's time and place. Someone objected that it should be a black velvet yarmulka. Rabbi Wein replied that black happened in the 1400s as a result of a Church ...


11

The minhag is sourced to the Talmud (Kiddushin 29b) that only married men would put the talis over their heads. א"ל מאי טעמא לא פריסת סודרא א"ל דלא נסיבנא Rashi: דלא פריס סודר - כדרך הנשואין שהיו רגילין לכסות ראשן


10

What I find interesting about the Rosh is that he remained an Ashkenazi-centrist, even in his host country. He started a Yeshibha based on the Ashkenaz model, married his sons, exclusively, to members of his own extended family (although he did marry his daughters to Sephardim, probably students at his Yeshibha..). Another interesting thing to point out is ...


10

You can own them (Rama in Shulchan Aruch OC 453:1). The Mishna Berura there adds that you can even derive benefit from them.


10

This answer assumes you're talking about conversation. My theory is that Yiddish and English, being mostly accented on the penultimate syllable, shift Hebrew to the same in natural Yiddish/Yinglish/English speech. Thus kash-RUTH becomes KASH-rus. Then the vowel on the ultimate syllable gets compressed to a shwa. KASH-rəs, which sounds like KASH-rihs.


10

I highly doubt there is any significance to such a pronunciation (although I stand to be corrected) but since you ask, here is a technical explanation (based on here and here): There are two types of sounds - ones where you use your voice, like b, d, g, f and z, and ones where you don't like p, t, k, v, and s. The ones that you use your voice for are called ...


9

There are lots of differences. Among the more obvious ones: Dialect - the Bavli is written in Eastern Aramaic, the Yerushalmi in Western Aramaic. There are differences in vocabulary (such as B. חזי = Y. חמי, both meaning "see" - we in fact use both of these in the second Kol Chamira on Erev Pesach morning), in word forms (the Bavli tends to drop final ן in ...


9

The Mishnah Berurah (OC 581:5) explains: many people have the custom to fast for ten days (including Yom Kippur) as part of seeking repentance (Levush). Starting from Rosh haShannah you lose at least four days: the two days of Rosh haShannah, Shabbat Shuvah (the Shabbat in between Rosh haShannah and Yom Kipppur) and the day before Yom Kippur (when it is ...


9

This article has a writeup on the subject, speculating that it was written no later than about 500 CE (i.e., during the Talmudic era), based on its style. Machzor Vitry in fact places it earlier, tracing it to the Anshei Knesses Hagedolah. Still other sources attribute it to R. Asher Halevi of Worms (late 11th-early 12th century). As for why it's said: ...


8

I think the main issue is not how close/far they were from one another, but who was in charge. By and large, Sepharadim were under Muslim rule, which allowed them freedoms that were not given to Ashkenazim by their Christian overlords. It was more of an Iron Curtain barrier than a distance barrier. One might also note the consistency with which Sepharadim ...


8

Rav Moshe Feinstein writes that all ethnic pronunciations of Hebrew are equally acceptable, even for chalitza which requires the reading of specific Hebrew verses. I'd assume the same would apply here, according to him.


8

From this post it seems that some do not say it even though Pesach does not occur in the middle of the week since there is a special prohibition against any (Mleches Uman) professional work on Erev Pesach after Chatzos and in Yerushalyim many observe this for the entire Erev Pesach. http://www.daat.ac.il/daat/toshba/minhagim/pru3.htm כשחל יום ראשון של ...


8

Hazon Ovadia Purim pg. 199 מה שנוהגים להתחפש וללבוש מסיכות בפורים, אין כל איסור בדבר.‏ It is Mutar to dress up Purim. What is Asur on Purim? Cross dressing Inviting magicians Making fun of the Rabbis on Purim (All from Yalkut Yosef 695)


8

Rav Yosef Messas a"h (he served as Rav in Tilimsan Algeria, Meknes Morocco, and as Sephardic Chief Rabbi of Haifa) held that wearing costumes/disguises on Purim is absolutely forbidden as hukas hagoyim and that its origins stem from an imitation of the pre-Lent festivity of Carnavale which itself has origins in the orgiastic paganism of Bacchanalia. He ...


8

Just because something is called a "delicatessen" and serves traditional Eastern European fare does not mean that the restaurant and its food conforms to the ritual and dietary standards of Kosher laws. Under these laws, meat and dairy are consumed separately and a restaurant, if it wanted to have rabbinical supervision, would have to serve one or the other. ...


7

The simple answer is because Shulhan Arukh 581:1 and the Arizal Sha'ar HaKavvanot 89d, Pri Etz Haim 128b(see also Likutei Torah 106b, Shaar Ruah HaKodesh 48a and Shaar HPesukim 41a) say so. For a more thorough answer according to halakha and Kabbalah see Divrei Shalom with perush Ner Shalom by R' Shalom Afjin(unfortunately not online). He essentially ...


7

so that woman who are looking to get married may see who is and is not married.


7

See the excellent article here regarding the proper nussach of zimmun. The highlights are: that the introductory bit (everything before Nevarech she'achalnu mishelo) is based on a ruling of the Zohar quoted in the Magen Avraham quoted in the Mishna Berura (OC 192 sk 2) and in the Aruch HaShulchan (OC 192:2) which says that every "davar shebikusha" needs a ...


7

There are sources beginning in the 1200s (the Mordechai and others) that quote the practice to avoid various legumes and semigrains; either because of concern that they make contain some wheat (or other chametz-causing grain) mixed in; or because if you grind them into flour, people may think you're using wheat flour (or barley spelt etc.) and making ...


7

In the terminology used in the Mishnah, the Biblical shekel is called a sela, and the former half-shekel is called a shekel. (Examples are legion - see, for example, Shekalim 1:6: הנותן סלע ונוטל שקל - one who gives a sela and asks for a shekel as change.) So it's quite correct to say that we will give a shekel.


7

Despite it's apparent similarity to pagan practices dating back thousands of years, this custom exists in some communities (particularly among Lubavitchers and some other Chassidic groups) and dates back at least several decades. Similar customs (such as eating colored eggs on Purim) existed in Jewish communities in Afghanistan and Yemen, and women in ...


6

Another point to add to Seth's: Jewish communities have gotten pretty "mixed up" over time. Ashkenazic Jewry basically descends from the Italian communities of the early Middle Ages, and some historians trace them and their traditions back to the Jews of Eretz Yisrael (as contrasted with the Sephardim, who derive their traditions from the Jews of ...


6

Ashkenazim in Eretz Yisroel generally follow the customs of the GR"A. One of his customs was omitting Boruch HaShem Leolam as an unnecessary interruption between the blessings following the Shema and the Shemone Esre. I would cite Siddur HaGR"A as a source except that I don't have a copy to confirm. As for why it is said, this related question might ...


6

My understanding is that until that point, if you wanted to study you'd have to pay your own way and find someplace to study. The Volozhin yeshiva raised funds, and didn't charge tuition. So it decoupled the education from paying for it. It was also more officially organized and centralized; usually you'd have to wander from town to town and unofficially ...


6

Erlau. They dress like Hassidim and they have a rebbe, who holds a tisch, but their traditions and minhagim are Chassam Sofer strictly (In fact, the Erlauer ravs are from the direct line of the Chassam Sofer, and their surname is in fact, Sofer.). They use Ashkenaz siddur, and their culture is an Oberlander culture. You'll also find, if you hang out ...


6

http://ohr.edu/ask_db/ask_main.php/38/Q1/ I spoke to Rav Chaim Pinchas Scheinberg, Zatzal, about the Halacha in this case. He told me that Sephardic Jews rule according to Rav Yosef Karo, and therefore use glass dishes for both meat and milk, while Ashkenazic Jews conduct themselves according to the opinion of Rav Moshe Isserlish, therefore ...


6

After-the-fact, Ashkenazim rule that glass never "treifs" up food. The question is whether I may go eat at his house in the first place, is that called "choosing to use glass dishes"? An easy way out is Rabbi Moshe Heinemann's view (shlit'a). From the Star-K: Q: There are many varieties of glass on the market. Do arcoroc, duralex, pyrex, corelle and ...


6

The reason a Mezuza is placed on an angle is due to a Machlokes - Taz - Yorah Deah 289:6 between Rashi and Rabbeinu Tam. Rashi holds it should be placed vertically and Rabbeinu Tam holds it should be placed horizontally. Per Sefer Yashar V'Tov quoting the Rosh in Menachos 33 אבל ברא"ש פירוש דלר"ת אתי לאשמועינן שתהא שיטה אחרונה לצד רשות הרבים וראשונה ...


6

The primary source for the orientation of the words of the Mezuzah is a cryptic Yerushalmi (Megillah 4:12) which states: ר' זעורא בשם שמואל צריך שיהא שמע שלה רואה את הפתח R' Ze'ura [said] in the name of Shemuel: [the Mezuzah] needs to be such that its 'Shema' sees the opening. For Rashi (Menachot 33a sv כמין), Rambam (Hilchot Mezuzah 5:8), and the ...



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