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13

The word is sin'af, תִנְאָף. Rashi and Rosh say it refers to sexual relations with a married woman not one's wife. Chizkuni says it refers to any prohibited sexual relations, and, if I understand him correctly, ibn Ezra says the same. S'forno says it refers primarily to the former but also to the latter. (All these sources are in their commentaries on this ...


9

The Hebrew word here is ne'ifa, and it doesn't occur all that often. The standard interpretation means "intercourse between a married woman and a man not her husband." The Talmud observes that just like commandment #6, #7 can warrant the death penalty in theory. The word is not zonah, which means "stray." That word can either mean prostitution, or a ...


8

That which you call the 10 commandments are in Hebrew referred to as the Aseres HaDibros, which means the 10 utterances or 10 statements. There is no implication that there are 10 commandments therein. I think your 40 is a bit excessive (as you conceded), but the classic counts list either 13 (Behag) or 14 (Rambam) commandments in these 10 statements. As ...


6

If I understand him correctly, Igros Moshe (OC4 22, IIRC) says that one may stand during the dibros so as to accord them honor and must do so if the rest of the congregation is doing so but that if he is concerned that that makes it seem like they're the only important part of the tora then he should stand also during the rest of the reading that day. As ...


5

On a less miraculous note, the ibn Ezra (Shemos 20:1)rejects a literal reading of the chazal that shamor and zachor were said simultaneously. In a lengthy piece, he promotes the idea that words embody meaning and when there is a quote of someone where words are added to the quote, or changed, this is not a contradiction. The quote is merely elaborating on ...


4

http://www.chabad.org/library/article_cdo/aid/912361/jewish/Chapter-Three.htm Halacha 10: It is forbidden to make decorative images of the human form alone. Therefore, it is forbidden to make human images with wood, cement, or stone. This [prohibition] applies when the image is protruding - for example, images and sculptures made in a hallway and the ...


4

Your siddur was probably "Od Yosef Hai", which is based on the teachings of Rabbi Yosef Hayyim of Bagdhad, the Ben Ish Hai. AFAIK, he didn't have a last name. He wrote two books on halacha that he's very well known for: Ben Ish Hai, and Od Yosef Hai. I'd be surprised if the siddur is missing commandments you say are missing. I have siddur Tefillat Refael, ...


4

See here: http://www.mesora.org/StandingDibros.html The Rambam was opposed to it. yet this is near universal custom. R' Soloveitchik and R' Moshe explain why it is not a problem.


4

Rashi (Shemos 24:12) writes that the ten commandments are 10 categories which the 613 fall under.The Bamidbar Rabbah writes that there is 620 letters in the ten commandments 613 for the mitzvos and 7 for the rabbanic mitzvos. It should be noted that singling out asres hadibros is not so simple because we don't want to show that it is more important than any ...


3

For a more historiological answer than @mochinRechavim's, see this article by Dr. Meshulam Margaliot at Bar-Ilan. Dr. Margaliot pursues this question along with R Nehemia's position in Shemot Rabbah 47.6 which agrees with the Sages' position in Mekhilta of Rabbi Ishmael (Tractate de-ba-Hodesh 5): How were the Ten Commandments given? Five on one tablet ...


3

R. Shalom Dovber Schneersohn (the fifth Lubavitcher Rebbe), in one of his discourses (Sukkos 5674, part of the series known as Beshaah Shehikdimu 5672, which he began delivering on Shavuos 100 years ago) gives an explanation that may bear on this. He points out (in sec. 205) that there are two letters of the alef-beis that are completely sealed closed: ...


2

There are many reasons. Gershon pointed out the balance between those for God and those for other people. Another is that the rabbis in the talmud (will look up source later) say that all other mitzvot can be derived from these ten -- they are, in a sense, "summary" mitzvot. Another (this may be more modern) is that they are the foundation of a functional ...


2

The distinction is found in the Mishna (Yoma 8:9 (English)): עברות ש​​​​​​​​​​​​​​בין אדם למקום, יום הכפורים מכפר.‏ עברות ש​​​​​​​​​​​​​​בין אדם לחברו כד, אין יום הכפורים מכפר, עד שירצה את חברו.‏ את זו דרש רבי אלעזר בן עזריה, (ויקרא טז) מכל חטאתיכם לפני יי תטהרו, עברות ש​​​​​​​​​​​​​​בין אדם למקום, יום הכפורים מכפר. עברות ש​​​​​​​​​​​​​​בין ...


2

Found a nice article on this issue, it says the same as above, in case of men only protruding (3D) images are forbidden, according to the majority of poskim, and even in that case a part of them allows scupltures which only form a face, or a face e.g. without an eye. The majority says drawings are allowed. Thus, halacha is more lenienet as the genral opinion ...


2

Tehilim 62:12 says: God spoke one thing, I heard two, for God has strength. Rashi says: ...our Sages interpreted it as referring to [the maxim that] “Remember” and “Keep” were stated in a single utterance. See also Rashi Shemot 20:8. In fact, Rashi (Shemot 20:1) says that all the 10 Commandments were originally said simultaneously, and ...


1

"The Ten Commandments" or Decalogue is not a Biblical concept - and you won't find a reference to it in the Tanach. So your question makes an assumption - based on a popular mistranslation! The closest you will get is a Pasuk in Devarim 10:4 וַיִּכְתֹּב עַל-הַלֻּחֹת כַּמִּכְתָּב הָרִאשׁוֹן, אֵת עֲשֶׂרֶת הַדְּבָרִים, אֲשֶׁר דִּבֶּר ה' אֲלֵיכֶם בָּהָר ...


1

Abarbanel explains this verse - that one may work the other 6 days - not that one is required to work. http://www.hebrewbooks.org/pagefeed/hebrewbooks_org_33655_43.pdf


1

For those looking for a more natural explanation. Squares are seen as supernatural, they rarely exist in nature without human creation. Squares, and things made into squares are a sign of our human status above nature, and our connection to the Divine.


1

There is a lot to unpack here kabbalistically but to give a very basic answer to your question repetition mathematically, linguistically or conceptually is a sign of emphasis in Judaism. In kabbalah you have the concept of magic squares (also referenced in the comments) as well as permutations of combinations of letters. Squares are used as a phyiscal ...



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