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Rasash Pesachim 53a writes that if a community's custom is not to eat roasted meat on the evening of 15 Iyar for the same reason it is not eaten on the night of Pesach, then they should not eat it. He writes that even in a community which doesn't have this custom, eating a full roasted lamb in the manner of the Korban Pesach would remain prohibited as that ...


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Your question is an interesting one. I researched this article on The Be'urei Hatefilah site (I highly recommend it, as it's one for the best resources on the web for Tefillah-related articles and insights.) My understanding is that there is some controversy. I recommend you read the whole article, but I will excerpt Sefer Avudraham - Dinei Kri'at ...


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I have learned with both the Koren and the Artscroll. I actually switched to the Koren Steinsaltz. I have been using it everyday to learn daf yomi for 2 years. It really depends what your looking for if one is better than the other. As far as explanation, I would not label Koren a review Gemorah. While Artscroll is known for it's explanation, Koren has a lot ...


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Sidur Bes Yaakov (Emden) says of this paragraph: אומרו במתון וכונה ושמחה That is: Say it with calmness, direction of thought, and joy.


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Tol'dos Yitzchak (by Rabbi Yitzchak Karo, uncle of the Bes Yosef) has two explanations: "to tell you whoever sees a sota in her detriment…": its explanation is as a way of a command: he's obliged to swear off of wine, in his seeing her death due to the drinking of wine…. And it is also natural: … "whoever sees a sota in her ...


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Hagahos Yavetz there says he thinks it means nature, and it is from here that the 'chachmei teva' took the expression. He says there is no other instance of this word in this usage. In Tel Torah the coin explanation is given. He couldn't tell the difference between all the coins in Bavel because they were all similar, kol shekein (how much more so) he ...


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The general point is made here in a Haggada printed in 1907. It doesn't give its source, and doesn't specifically point out how the 9 months fits. Regarding pregnancy, specifically, this is in the Talmud Sotah 11b, although I suppose the emphasis on "carrying pregnancies to term", as opposed to just working to have babies, could be a bit of editorializing by ...


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See this discussion. Some scholars have claimed that the Zohar's use of Teva to mean "nature" is anachronistic and does not reflect Talmudic usage. In trying to debunk this claim. Rabbi Miller tries to find instances in the Mishnah and Talmud where it means nature. But if it means coinage, then there is no proof. The other answer here points out Hagahos ...


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After the Amida on Kol Nidrei night, there are a few paragraphs of Selichot that are said. The 3rd or 4th starts with the words Omnon Ken - and the Aaron HaKodesh is opened while saying it - hence "pesicha of Omnon Ken". It's on page 175 of the Interlinear ArtScroll Yom Kippour Machzor, Ashkenaz edition.


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Nusach ashkenaz in artscroll is slightly misleading. 'Nusach ashkenaz' implies the german nusach when really it's minhag polin/lita. So the ashkenaz of artscroll is according to the litvish custom. If you find a siddur that's published in germany or hungary and says "nusach ashkenaz" it will be slightly different


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Menachos 36b says that one should constantly be touching his Tefilin, in order not to forget that he is wearing it. אמר רבה בר רב הונא חייב אדם למשמש בתפילין בכל שעה קל וחומר מציץ ומה ציץ שאין בו אלא אזכרה אחת אמרה תורה והיה על מצחו תמיד שלא תסיח דעתו ממנו תפילין שיש בהן אזכרות הרבה על אחת כמה וכמה This is codified in Orach Chaim 28:1.



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