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16

I don't see it as a "punishment" any more than one is punished by having to read Shakespeare in his Elizabethan English, rather than in an "updated" text. It's not because the language is sacred, it's because that's the one that it was written in. After all, every translation is a commentary; are you really satisfied with limiting yourself to those composed ...


6

I have learned with both the Koren and the Artscroll. I actually switched to the Koren Steinsaltz. I have been using it everyday to learn daf yomi for 2 years. It really depends what your looking for if one is better than the other. As far as explanation, I would not label Koren a review Gemorah. While Artscroll is known for it's explanation, Koren has a lot ...


6

Your question is an interesting one. I researched this article on The Be'urei Hatefilah site (I highly recommend it, as it's one for the best resources on the web for Tefillah-related articles and insights.) My understanding is that there is some controversy. I recommend you read the whole article, but I will excerpt Sefer Avudraham - Dinei Kri'at ...


6

According to Tiferes Yisroel the gemara was redacted multiple times by Ravina and Rav Ashi. The reformatted the words to make them more contemporary. The Masechtos they didn't get around to have uncommon words. But apparently even they didn't pull off a complete switcharoo. Over those centuries Latin and other languages were interpolated. But no complete ...


4

Aramaic is actually one of the biblical languages (Daniel, Ezra/Nehemia) and even has words in the Pentateuch (e.g. "ygar sahadutha" by the treaty of Lavan and Yaakov). The Maharal interprets the unique significance of Aramaic and advocates that shanyim mikra v'echad targum specifically employ Targum Onkelos for this reason. (In seeming contrast, the gemara ...


4

According to an interview, the name comes because the publisher made fancy ketubot: Y.H. [interviewer]: If I remember correctly, ArtScroll started off publishing fancy high-end kesubos… N[osson] S[cherman of ArtScroll]: Yes, ArtScroll’s name came from that. Meir Zlotowitz had a company that was involved in such printing.


3

Hagahos Yavetz there says he thinks it means nature, and it is from here that the 'chachmei teva' took the expression. He says there is no other instance of this word in this usage. In Tel Torah the coin explanation is given. He couldn't tell the difference between all the coins in Bavel because they were all similar, kol shekein (how much more so) he ...


2

The general point is made here in a Haggada printed in 1907. It doesn't give its source, and doesn't specifically point out how the 9 months fits. Regarding pregnancy, specifically, this is in the Talmud Sotah 11b, although I suppose the emphasis on "carrying pregnancies to term", as opposed to just working to have babies, could be a bit of editorializing by ...


2

I am rather surprised at the answers here. There is nothing wrong with learning gemoro in English. But the fact is, it was written in Aramaic. Anyone who has learned meforshim will tell you that each word is 'counted'. There are no superfluous words. Every word contains a chiddush! No one can write like that today, so the English translation is not like the ...


2

Wikipedia says the following: In 1975,[1] Zlotowitz, a graduate of Mesivtha Tifereth Jerusalem, was director of a high-end graphics studio in New York.[2] The firm, named ArtScroll Studios,[1] produced brochures,[3] invitations, awards and ketubahs.[1]… The name ArtScroll was chosen for the publishing company to emphasize the visual ...


1

In addition to @SabbaHillel's answer, this site appears to show streams flowing into the Dead Sea from all directions:


1

The map on page 923 showing the borders of Eretz Yisrael does not show that line. It appears to be an artifact of the cut and paste method used to create the map or of the boundary line between the east and the west in order to show the three cities of refuge on each side.


1

It's helpful if said bochurim plan to learn almost any post-Talmudic Torah literature too. Commentaries on the Gemara, commentaries on Shulchan Aruch, responsa, and much else use a lot of Talmudic expressions.


1

See this discussion. Some scholars have claimed that the Zohar's use of Teva to mean "nature" is anachronistic and does not reflect Talmudic usage. In trying to debunk this claim. Rabbi Miller tries to find instances in the Mishnah and Talmud where it means nature. But if it means coinage, then there is no proof. The other answer here points out Hagahos ...


1

After the Amida on Kol Nidrei night, there are a few paragraphs of Selichot that are said. The 3rd or 4th starts with the words Omnon Ken - and the Aaron HaKodesh is opened while saying it - hence "pesicha of Omnon Ken". It's on page 175 of the Interlinear ArtScroll Yom Kippour Machzor, Ashkenaz edition.


1

Nusach ashkenaz in artscroll is slightly misleading. 'Nusach ashkenaz' implies the german nusach when really it's minhag polin/lita. So the ashkenaz of artscroll is according to the litvish custom. If you find a siddur that's published in germany or hungary and says "nusach ashkenaz" it will be slightly different


1

Menachos 36b says that one should constantly be touching his Tefilin, in order not to forget that he is wearing it. אמר רבה בר רב הונא חייב אדם למשמש בתפילין בכל שעה קל וחומר מציץ ומה ציץ שאין בו אלא אזכרה אחת אמרה תורה והיה על מצחו תמיד שלא תסיח דעתו ממנו תפילין שיש בהן אזכרות הרבה על אחת כמה וכמה This is codified in Orach Chaim 28:1.



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