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they were able to survive because they had hope. the books of the prophets provide clear predictions that eventually the temple would be rebuilt permanently, the messiah would come, no more wars, etc.


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As mentioned by Mike, the destruction of the Second Temple was like the climax of a slowly moving glacier that eventually splashes into the ocean. Even after the rebellion finally started, it took nearly three years for the Romans to fully conquer the Galilee and the North and then finally pivot down to Jerusalem. This gave enough time for the non-Zealot ...


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Your example is politically loaded. Let's try a simpler one. Joe makes a vow not to eat chocolate. Then he finds himself on a desert island where there is no food other than chocolate, and he will otherwise die of starvation. (Or more simply -- he's having a diabetic emergency and the only available food is chocolate.) The prohibition of violating a vow is ...


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Yehoshua was a prophet Mishneh Torah» Sefer Madda » Yesodei haTorah - Chapter Ten Halacha 5: When a prophet proclaims that another individual is [also] a prophet, we accept the latter as a prophet without requiring [any further] investigation. Thus, after Moses, our teacher, proclaimed that Joshua [was a prophet], all the Jews believed in him before ...


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The Talmud (Gittin 56a) relates the following about the Zealot-Pharisee relationship: The biryoni [presumed to be Zealots] were then in the city. The Rabbis said to them: Let us go out and make peace with them [the Romans]. They would not let them, but on the contrary said, Let us go out and fight them. The Rabbis said: You will not succeed. They then ...


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It's not that horses were exclusive to Egypt. Rather, Egypt was the source of the best and most sophisticatedly bred horses and would constantly look towards egypt to maintain his menagerie. A king with many horses make himself dependent on Egypt just as a country with many cars would be dependent on Saudi Arabia or Iran vayimach shemam. Sources: Little ...


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Judaism was able to survive the destruction of the Second Temple because Rabbi Yohanan ben Zakkai set up an academy in Yavne where Torah could be taught and a generation of sages figured out how to convert Biblical, sacrifice-oriented Judaism into Rabbinic Judaism, centered on prayer, study, and righteous deeds. From Avot d' Rabbi Natan 4:5 Once, Rabban ...



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