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9

The English term for this tool is an entrenching tool. Here it is described as standard issue gear for a paratrooper in the IDF. As far as I know, it is pretty standard, when required, for soldiers in most any modern army. I suppose we could speculate if the Torah requires a soldier to carry one even if it isn't technically needed (just in case ...) or if ...


0

I found this drasha on the Daf Yomi Notes for Megillah 16: The Gemora relates that Achashverosh ordered Haman to get Mordechai, dress him in the royal garments and lead him through the city on the king’s horse proclaiming, “Thus shall be done for the man whom the king wishes to honor.” Haman located Mordechai teaching his students the laws of ...


0

The reason that a Jew can take a nonjewish married lady is because there is no ishus for nonjews. This would not apply to a married Jewish lady obviously, but leaves the question open to an unmarried one. In general many of the halachos drashos and psukim all revolve around the assumption that we are dealing specifically with a non jew, but the fact that no ...


1

The Rambam (Malachim U'Milchamos 1:2) says that the Mitzvah of destroying Amalek only applies once a King is appointed, and a King is only appointed after they have conquered the land. So the need for armaments would not have been then, but rather only later.


3

In the Metsudah Tehillem and http://www.tehilimhotline.org/prayer_categories.asp it says which chapters should be said at which occaison, the one's pertaining to this matter would be(I think): For the Jewish People 43, 79, 80, 83 For help in troublesome times 20, 38, 85, 86, 102, 130, 142 For peace 46 For success 112 Chabad.org ...


3

Based on what I've seen, Psalm 130 is also commonly recited with 121. Additionally, it would appear to me that Psalm 20 is appropriate based on its references to HaShem fighting for us.


5

While I am not aware that there is any authoritative list, It seems that among several that are coomonly said is Tehillim 121. I believe this was chosen as a general Tehillim to be said for people who are ill as well as people in danger, such as soldiers. The reason is because it starts with the phrase "I lift my eyes to the mountains, from where will ...


0

According to this: It was a partial quote from Barbara Ordman, who lives in Ma’ale Adumim on the West Bank. Her exact quotation was: "As one of the terrorists from Gaza was reported to say when asked why they couldn’t aim their rockets more effectively: “We do aim them, but their God changes their path in mid-air." Barbara Ordman is a Jew saying ...



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