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10

Judaism 101 writes, Judaism does not prohibit writing the Name of God per se; it prohibits only erasing or defacing a Name of God. However, observant Jews avoid writing any Name of God casually because of the risk that the written Name might later be defaced, obliterated or destroyed accidentally or by one who does not know better. The ...


6

Indeed, as SethJ and ShmuelBrin noted in their comments, the Gemara (Eruvin 11b) discusses such a case. Shulchan Aruch (Orach Chaim 362:12) summarizes it thus: כיפה, אם יש ברגליה דהיינו קודם שהתחיל להתעגל י' טפחים, מותרת משום צורת פתח "An archway, if its legs - before it begins to curve - are at least ten tefachim tall, then it is permissible as a ...


5

In Shulchan Aruch YD Siman 286:4 it says that a bathroom and bathhouse etc. are exempt from Mezuzah because they are not made for Diras Kavod. In Shu"t Minchas Yitzchok part 4 Siman 89 & 90 he adds that if they (bathroom etc.) are not used for anything that would obligate them to have a Mezuzah (i.e. some people use a bathroom to store things therein) ...


4

You can fill a Mikva straight from a faucet, but the Mikva must be configured in a certain way, and rainwater is still required. (This applies to all Mikvaot, not just for Keilim (dishes).) According to the Sifra on Vayikra 11:36 and Zevachim 25b, if you have two pools, one filled with kosher water (eg, rainwater), and another filled with pasul water (eg. ...


4

In short, there are two ways to make "drawn water" (as in tap water) kosher. Hashaka - If tap water touches "kosher" water, it becomes kosher. This is a classic "side by side" construction. Zeriya - If one "plants" "non-kosher" water into "kosher" water, it becomes kosher. The problem with these two methods is that there are some opinions which say that ...


3

The following is my understanding based on things I've read, but I can't give any sources at present. On a physical level, a doorway or a gateway is the dividing line between one domain and another. If there is a door, opening it allows people or things to go from one domain to the other, and closing it effects the opposite. (And bolting the door adds ...


3

The Kitzur Shulchan Aruch in 190:1 states that our roofs don't need a fence since we don't use them. Obviously slanted roofs are therefore exempt. He goes on the say that not only roofs, but any place where there's a danger of falling off and getting killed, requires a fence. For the record, this fence needs to be 10 tefachim high and strong enough that a ...


2

See Shulchan Aruch - Orach Chaim 151:12 יב יֵשׁ לִזָּהֵר מִלְּהִשְׁתַּמֵּשׁ (טז) בָּעֲלִיּוֹת שֶׁעַל גַּבֵּי בֵּית הַכְּנֶסֶת תַּשְׁמִישׁ קָבוּעַ שֶׁל גְּנַאי, כְּגוֹן לִשְׁכַּב שָׁם; וּשְׁאָר תַּשְׁמִישִׁים, יֵשׁ לְהִסְתַּפֵּק אִם מֻתָּר לְהִשְׁתַּמֵּשׁ שָׁם. הגה: וְכָל זֶה דַּוְקָא בְּבֵית הַכְּנֶסֶת קָבוּעַ, שֶׁנִּבְנָה מִתְּחִלָּה לְכָךְ, אֲבָל ...


2

The Kitzur Shulchan Aruch (11:1) mentions that a door that is only opened on rare occasions (like when deliveries are being made) while most of the time another door is used for access to the room, then the first door is except from a Mezuzah. It would follow that a door that you can no longer use should be except from a Mezuzah. The following is based on ...


2

I know there is a model in the Chabad library that is based on the opinion of the Rambam. It was made by Rabbi Dov Lavnoni, and he published a book with pictures of the model, and sources for all the design choices etc. although i can't seem to be able to find any links to buy it other than this: http://www.gilboabooks.co.il here is also a video of him ...


2

The Pasuk mentions that the whole point of the tower was for the Bnei Bavel to make a name for themselves.(11:4) Additionally, when the Torah goes through the genealogy it mentions Nimrod as a Gibor Tzayid(10:9) and Rashi explains that he was good at convincing people to rebel against Hash-m. So Rabbi Storch explained that this means that he convinced the ...


1

This Shiur by Rabbi Brofsky says The Rema (166; see Tosafot, Sota 39a) adds that one should not delay reciting ha-motzi for more than the amount of time it takes to walk 22 amot (approximately 11 meters). The Acharonim (see Arukh Ha-Shulchan 166:2, for example) record that some are even careful to wash their hands close to their table in order ...


1

My current Sukkah (a 20'x10') is made from Ruff Cut Ceder Wood 10' long 2x4s held together by galvanized bolts with nuts and washers (Two at each joint set at a diagonal). The walls are agricultural shade cloth (I'm in the south) held taught with hundreds of zip ties. To turn the corners I used construction grade L braces that fit the 3/8" bolts. Total cost ...


1

I bought the frame for my current sukkah from The Sukkah Project. Their 8x8 (expansions available) currently lists for $345, but that includes the walls. When I bought mine I ordered without walls (I already had material I could use) and that dropped the price noticeably, but I don't now remember by how much. You could email them and ask. This sukkah ...


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I would strongly recommend finding the used market for sukkas in your area. Your shul or community may have an active email list for stuff like this, or your community may have an active branch of luach.com. In the run-up to Sukkot as well as other times (such as the Summer, when many people relocate), you will frequently find used sukkas offered for sale, ...


1

Have a look at Chayei Adam 145:3 While four walls are ideal, if you have two walls that form a corner, and the third wall has at least a tefach (~4 inches) of width and forms a tzuras hapesach, that works. (He continues on a discussion whether this is an adequate "private space" with regards to carrying on shabbos; basically if we call it good enough to ...



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