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14

You're technically allowed to urinate anywhere if you need to (even in your mother-in-law's ear if you have nowhere else to go, lol [bechoros 44b]). As such, any style toilet in a private room exceeds urination requirements. (It permitted to urinate in public - bechoros 44b) Single-occupancy bathrooms are preferable to multiple. Berachos 62b relates a ...


11

Judaism 101 writes, Judaism does not prohibit writing the Name of God per se; it prohibits only erasing or defacing a Name of God. However, observant Jews avoid writing any Name of God casually because of the risk that the written Name might later be defaced, obliterated or destroyed accidentally or by one who does not know better. The ...


10

They aren't all built near the ground - for example the mens mikvah where I live is on the second floor. However they frequently build them on the ground simply because water is extremely heavy, and building it higher up requires special building reinforcement - the building would basically have to be built specifically to be a mikvah, and could not be ...


9

According to the Mishna (Sotah 9:12), the Shamir wasn't extinct until the destruction of the second Beis Hamikdash. Incidentally, there is no mention of the Shamir in Rambam. Ever the rationalist, Rambam doesn't believe in demons (which were associated with the Shamir). He held that it was okay to quarry and cut the stones outside the Beis Hamikdash area, ...


8

It is discussed by R' Yitzchak Weiss here, and see a brief summary in English here. R' Weiss identifies one Acharon that would logically require a mezuza on an elevator door (the inner door to the elevator itself) even if the elevator is less that 4x4 amos. He rules, therefore, that one should affix a mezuza to an elevator without a b'racha. He ...


8

I think that the inner colonnaded wall in the Garrard model is actually meant to demarcate the original area of the Temple Mount, which per the Mishnah, Middos 2:1 (English translation here) was a square, 500 cubits (about 800-1000 feet) to a side. [The outer wall, with its colonnade, would be the enlarged area after Herod's renovation of the Temple, ...


8

There are two main opinions, one by Rashi saying that are straight lines going up at an angle, seen also in the Rambam on the Mishna and R' Abraham his son. See sources: רש"י על התורה שמות כה, לב. והציור בפירוש המשנה לרמב"ם מנחות ג, ז. ודעת ר' אברהם בן הרמב"ם בדעת אביו. וכן כתב העזרת כהנים מידות ד, ז.‏ The other opinion is the Ibn Ezra, and it is the ...


8

I heard once in a recording from R. Y.S. Schorr that Shamai represented a middas hadin, an exacting attitude of strict justice (as is evidenced by those very stories). His measuring stick was a display of just that point - everything had to be measured and exactly according to what was deserved.


7

The Posuk does not say that there was more sun than shade. On the contrary the Posuk says "Vayeshev Tacteho Bzel" which translates into "He sat under it in the shade. The following Posuk says that a Kikoyon was shade upon him, and the Radak explains that this happened 40 days later when the Sukka dried out and therefore it was not providing shade anymore.


7

Another possibility might just be to use a local pond or lake. (Rivers or streams are a possibility too, but there are more halachic issues with those, involving issues of how much groundwater vs. rainwater they contain.) Those generally aren't usable for human mikvaos because of the lack of privacy, but that wouldn't apply to dishes.


7

Some experience-based recommendations: I'm just curious, which method is most durable? Steel cable like this is excellent for durability. But it is much harder to manipulate into the non-looped over-then-through formation. In general this formation is difficult to anchor and particularly unreliable if the pole has a round cross section - due to ...


7

In the Sefer Avnei Yashfei 4:109:2 was asked if a sefer Torah fell inside the Aron Kodesh does one have to fast. He writes that one does not have to fast(there is more savoros but put in whats applicable here), the main reason being that it is not a place for walking like the Atzei HaLevanon 2:71 writes(he is quoted in previous part of tshuva regarding some ...


7

The Ramban deals with this and points out that it must be a miracle. A WHOLE NEW WORLD and Ramban on the Torah: The Ark’s Size both show the explanation of this. God’s Instructions to Noah outline the ark’s dimensions: three hundred amot long, fifty amot wide and thirty amot high (Bereishit 6:15). Ramban (commentary on 6:19) notes that such a structure ...


7

http://vbm-torah.org/archive/shmuel/79shmuel.htm The Radak rejects such an explanation, saying: "He saw from upon the roof that she was bathing in her house." This understanding is reasonable, both because the roof was already mentioned at the beginning of the verse, and because if the words "from the roof" relate to Bat-Sheva's bathing, it ...


6

When I did construction on my home I asked about this and was told that there is no need to leave an unfinished spot in America. The difference between American and Israeli construction methods should explain this. In Israel, everything is poured concrete, and plaster is put over it - thus it would make sense to continue to practice of leaving one square ...


6

Anything that grows from the ground and is not 'mekabel tumah' is a candidate for scach[sic]. These are two of the three basic requirements. The last is that the material not be currently attached to the ground. This disqualifies, for example, building a suka next to a vineyard and stretching some vines (which fill the other two criteria) over as ...


6

The standard design for a contemporary mikva has it fed by a system of gutters that channel rainwater directly into the mikva, without any elbows or other feature that could temporarily "hold" the water. I'd figure this design would be simplified with a ground-level mikva.


6

Indeed, as SethJ and ShmuelBrin noted in their comments, the Gemara (Eruvin 11b) discusses such a case. Shulchan Aruch (Orach Chaim 362:12) summarizes it thus: כיפה, אם יש ברגליה דהיינו קודם שהתחיל להתעגל י' טפחים, מותרת משום צורת פתח "An archway, if its legs - before it begins to curve - are at least ten tefachim tall, then it is permissible as a ...


5

Since no one has bitten yet, I will try to answer quickly and confirm/find sources latter. According to those opinions, such as Rav Moshe Feinstein zt'l, who do no require a mechitza to obscure the view of the women's section one might think that no additional barrier is required on a balcony beyond what the ma'akeh needed for safety. Nevertheless Rav Moshe ...


5

CYLOR regarding following R' Dovid Miller's instructions. If I remember correcty, he allows the use of tap water through a rubber connection. Nowadays, most do not rely on this, but may be lenient for rabbinic or keli use.


5

The document shows a nail in a post, but what I've often seen used in eruvin (I assume for convenience) are eye bolts like these: (picture from Wikipedia)


5

Whatever makes the most sense for you and your kitchen.


5

Trees branches and bamboo poles are popular. I most prefer evergreen tree branches because they look the prettiest and may even have a nice aroma. Anything that grows from the ground and is not 'mekabel tumah' is a candidate for scach. Fruit is an example of an item that is 'mekabel tumah.' mekabel tumah = something that can become ritually impure


5

The Minchas Chinuch in Mitzva 254 writes (my own translation): It seems clear that although the Gemora only specified the design of the building, the design of the utensils the Shulchan and the Menorah, it is not limited to these but rather it is also prohibited to make a likeliness of the Mizbeach Penimi. However, it seems clear that this is ...


5

In Shulchan Aruch YD Siman 286:4 it says that a bathroom and bathhouse etc. are exempt from Mezuzah because they are not made for Diras Kavod. In Shu"t Minchas Yitzchok part 4 Siman 89 & 90 he adds that if they (bathroom etc.) are not used for anything that would obligate them to have a Mezuzah (i.e. some people use a bathroom to store things therein) ...


5

You can fill a Mikva straight from a faucet, but the Mikva must be configured in a certain way, and rainwater is still required. (This applies to all Mikvaot, not just for Keilim (dishes).) According to the Sifra on Vayikra 11:36 and Zevachim 25b, if you have two pools, one filled with kosher water (eg, rainwater), and another filled with pasul water (eg. ...


5

The Chassam Sofer says that Shammai was actually a builder by trade. He wanted to show this apikores that there is more to religion than just kindness to your fellow, its possible to be a talmid chacham and a builder. Whereas Hillel said that you can learn on one foot, i.e. kindness, but don't forget that includes kindness to Hashem which means keeping His ...


4

The Chayei Adom(137:1) says a person who has a home should leave a part of the wall without plaster or paint. The person who does it is guaranteed that his house will stand forever ,and nothing will happen to it (Kaf Ha’chaim 560:11). There is a weak Heter today as people homes are made of less permanant material,sand mixed into the plaster (Rivevos Ephraim ...


4

To tie the schach in place, many people/places use plastic cable ties, as they're not "mekabel tumah." Some rabbis consider this not the preferred way, as the tie-downs should ideally also be plant matter.


4

Here's my understanding of what you have to do, based on setting one of these up, with Rabbinic guidance, for a few years in college. I've never studied the relevant laws in depth, but I believe based on what I learned in practice from my Rabbi that under normal conditions, the following procedure will do the trick. Ask your Rabbi to be sure. This will be a ...



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