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11

There is a teshuva of the Rema in which he writes that if you find a Teshuva of the Gaonim, you could follow its opinion. I asked R' Zvi Berkowitz about this and he said this was restricted specifically to the period of the Gaonim, because the Rishonim themselves (on whom much of our codification is based) would have taken the position of the Gaon into ...


10

It's perfectly plausible that God commanded, for instance, to use designs similar to existing idolatrous ones, and instead turn them on their head by modifying them to build the Tabernacle. Similarly, the Torah quotes the curses that were written by professionals before Sichon went to battle against Moab. They were written by someone else, but for whatever ...


5

Depending on what you mean exactly, the answer is yes and no. In terms of the actual canonized text of the TaNa"Ch, no, it is final and closed. There are very few instances of deviation between traditional texts, and they are all documented and accounted for. One example of potential "changes" or "improvements" actually was discovered in the Dead Sea ...


5

I don't know if they address this concern particularly in terms of the expense. However, the knowledge that murex indigo is chemically identical to plant-based indigo is something knowable only in the 20th and 21st century, when we know about atoms, molecules, and chemicals. If plant-based indigo failed the gemara's test for fastness, and this was just a ...


3

I'll give it a try. There are some inaccuracies in your question that should be clarified before considering the question of Ankhmahor as Yosef. This is not "the earliest archeological evidence we have for Bris Milah." It was once thought to be, but that award now goes to a recently discovered relief fragment of two children being circumcised, found in the ...


2

Check out http://www.daat.ac.il/daat/vl/tohen.asp?id=676 חלק א . By the way - read the rest of the book too. It is amazing.


1

According to הרב מאיר הלוי הלמן - לבוש הארון (modern English sefer on Techeiles), on page 21: The color of murex dye was commonly known as “Tyrian Purple”, as the city of Tyre (today in Lebanon) was the leading center for purple dye production. Murex dye had “great brilliance and fastness in comparison with other known dye”. These qualities, as ...


1

Essential Qualification: [NOTE: I am fully aware that what follows may be seen as off topic to this question, however I have enough experience with "messianic" groups and their beliefs to know that this is an absolutely essential qualification to make regarding this question.] While the previous answer is sound indeed, many have tried to apply this ...


1

Asimov's Guide to the Bible by Isaac Asimov takes an academic view but includes information about both miraculous and mundane archaeology. He does invoke rabbinical sources and I was surprised that certain things are actually supported. Og's bed, for example, is indeed visible to this day.


1

The Riddle of the Exodus by James Long adheres fairly well to Orthodox religious beliefs (it was recommended to me by an Orthodox Rabbi), and discusses much of the relevant archaeology. The book's focus is, like the title, on the Exodus: showing that the decline of the great empire of Egypt corresponds with the time of the Biblical story of its destruction ...


1

Eretz Chemda 28 says that the Western Wall / Kosel HaMaaravi was originally built by King David. I sent an e-mail to Aish and received the following response. As for the story about the angels saying "This Wall, the work of the poor, shall never be destroyed" -- a book called “Agadot Eretz Yisrael” by Ze’ev Vilnai records and notes that it is "a ...


1

In Shaarei Kedusha part 3 gate 2 it implies they were angels, so it's a question whether or not they had physical bones. It also implies there that they did not "die" but were banished somewhere (perhaps olamot hatohu?) "And therefore, the angels did not descend below to wear a physical body,because certainly they would be defeated by the klipos. ...


1

I posted my question as a follow-up to the one mentioned in the comments above. Rabbi Dov Lior answered it at http://www.yeshiva.org.il/ask/?id=77609 as follows (translation mine): אין ליהנות מהם, אך לימוד אינו נחשב הנאה – כי קול ומראה וריח אין בהם משום הנאה.‏ One may not derive benefit from them, but study is not considered benefit – since [as a ...


1

While not a direct match, Shadal did make a similar statement regarding the printing of old manuscripts. "God sees how topsy-turvy the present (=mid-19th century) is and he acts for the good of his creation, knowing that each generation needs its teachers and judges. To understand how God acts, think of a king who rules over a vast empire. When he ...



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