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13

Jastrow says it indicates the subjunctive mood. If so, in Gen. 26:10, כִּזְעֵיר פּוֹן שְׁכֵיב means "he almost had lain" as opposed to "he almost lay"; in Gen. 31:27, וְשַׁלַּחְתָּךְ פּוֹן means "I'd have sent you" as opposed to "I sent you"; in Num. 22:29, אִלּוּ פּוֹן אִית חַרְבָּא means "if there were a sword" as opposed to "if there is a sword"; and in ...


12

I believe it's been out of copyright for a while. You can access the whole book online here: http://www.tyndalearchive.com/TABS/Jastrow/ It's also available on Google Books, though I only found Vol. 2 there. Vol 1 and Vol 2 are available on Hebrewbooks.org.


12

"I davka haven't seen that movie." I purposely haven't seen that movie. or I specifically have NOT seen that movie. "He doesn't eat peanut butter, b'shita" He doesn't eat peanut butter, on principle. (or "as a matter of principle"). "Mamash" in proper Hebrew usage should translate as "tangible"; that works sometimes. "He's mamash the ...


11

Otzar Ta'amei Haminhagim (cf.) explains that it is a remnant of a time when the spoken language was Aramaic. Since the primary purpose of s'fira is the keeping track of days it is preferable to count in a language that enables the counter to keep track - i.e. a language the counter understands.


10

Grammatically, I guess "nafkei minah" would have to be the correct plural if there are two practical differences emerging from one distinction, or "nafkei minayhu" if they're completely disjoint. (See Avodah Zarah 28b and Shabbos 23b, respectively, although in neither place is the expression being used in the sense of "a practical difference or outcome.") ...


9

From Jastrow, page 299: This seems like a better, and more straightforward, etymology. There is a clear basis in Ezra 7:23: כג כָּל-דִּי, מִן-טַעַם אֱלָהּ שְׁמַיָּא, יִתְעֲבֵד אַדְרַזְדָּא, לְבֵית אֱלָהּ שְׁמַיָּא: דִּי-לְמָה לֶהֱוֵא קְצַף, עַל-מַלְכוּת מַלְכָּא וּבְנוֹהִי. 23 Whatsoever is commanded by the God of heaven, let it be done exactly for the ...


9

There is at least one possible usage of קרח in Tanach in the sense of "ice" - Ezek. 1:22 (כעין הקרח הנורא), which Targum Yonasan translates as גליד חסין, "strong ice." [Metzudos also renders some other instances of קרח as גליד, the Talmudic word for ice (from the root גלד, as you noted), as in Mikvaos 7:1 and Bava Basra 20a.] To follow up on msh210's point, ...


9

(Moved from comment section): The word קא indicates that the action is on-going or in the state of being done. It corresponds to the English prefix a-, which used to be used much more frequently but now is uncommon in the Enlish of the northern United States yet it is still very common in the Enlish of the southern United States. Here are some examples in ...


8

In Aramaic, the suffix "ey h" means "his." In this context, the antecedent is God.


8

The entire prayer, except for the last line, is in Aramaic. צלי, צלא, or צלו are different constructs of the word meaning "pray". צלותהון means "their prayers". As for the root, I believe it is likely correct that it is צלא, though a part of me wants to go digging in my old Aramaic text books to rule out the possibility that it is צלי. I have never heard ...


8

Rabbi Tzvi Hirsch Chayos (assuming he falls under your definition of "Orthodox") discusses this in the opening section of his Iggeres Bikores. At first astounded at where Rashi conjures this information given that the implication of the gemara is that a targum existed only as far back as the time of Ezra, he concludes that perhaps what Rashi (and others ...


8

As I learned in the various Aramaic language classes I took in Revel, the yud in these cases is silent, and only exists to show the plurality. The parallel is to Hebrew, where the yud appears after the segol, but is also entirely unpronounced. For example in אֲבוֹתֶיךָ, it is to be pronounced avotecha, not avoteycha.


7

The correct translation of Nafka Minah is not 'practical differences'. It is 'comes out from it'. The reason this has evolves as slang for 'practical differences' is because people used to ask each other after a certain logic or din has been applied, what comes out from it i.e. what is the practical difference with that logic/din added. However whether only ...


7

I posed this question to a tenured professor, whose PhD was in Aramaic Biblical Exegesis, and who is a published expert on several Semitic languages. This is what he wrote (edited for brevity; it was over several email exchanges over several months): Nafka minnah means the "thing that come out from it" The plural will therefore ought be "the things that ...


6

תלמוד ירושלמי מסכת סוטה דף טז עמוד א; פרק ג הלכה ד אמר ליה ישרפו דברי תורה ואל ימסרו לנשים.‏ מטרונה שאלה את רבי לעזר מפני מה חט אחת במעשה העגל והן מתים בה שלש מיתות. אמר לה אין חכמתה של אשה אלא בפילכה דכתיב (שמות לה) וכל אשה חכמת לב בידיה טוו. אמר לו הורקנוס בנו בשביל שלא להשיבה דבר אחד מן התורה איבדת ממני שלש מאות כור מעשר בכל שנה. אמר ליה ישרפו ...


6

The definitive work on this topic is Frumspeak, by Chaim Weiser. You might also find the Wikipedia entry on Yeshivish to be enlightening, and perhaps humorous too!


6

There's also the Jastrow online. http://www.tyndalearchive.com/tabs/jastrow/ But that might be overkill, by the standards of Frank.


6

Not a comprehensive answer, but some sources indicate that Aramaic (לשון תרגום) has its own unique spiritual significance. (See Maggid Meisharim, Toldos, re:kaddish and, for a general discussion of Aramaic,מאמר קדמות הזהר להרד"ל, ענף החמישי.)


6

From the Ohr Somayach "Ask the Rabbi" site: We see evidence that Adam spoke Hebrew because he gave Eve two names, each of which makes sense only in Hebrew. He called her isha (woman) because "she was taken from ish (man)," and he called her Chava (Eve) because "she was to be Mother of all chai (life)." The very name Adam is from the Hebrew word ...


5

It is Hebrew. דתנן ר' יהודה אומר הוי זהיר בתלמוד ששגגת תלמוד עולה זדון. Note that this is a Mishna, and ש to mean 'that/for', instead of ד. You can look up the word in Jastrow. http://www.tyndalearchive.com/TABS/Jastrow/index.htm Other words on the same pattern: targum; tafnuk (delicacy).


5

"Beseder" OK "Gevaldik" Great "It was bizyonos" It was embarrassing (Givaldiger bizyonos would be greatly embarrassing. Are you catching on?) "I can't be masig why he'd do such a thing." I can't fathom why he'd do such a thing. "Lchoyra it was because it wasn't shayach." Presumably, it was because it wasn't possible. ...


5

Many explain the song as an allegory for Jewish history, including Rav Baruch halevi Epstein, who uses the following symbology: Goat = Nation of IsraelFather = God2 coins = 2 luchosOther things = Galus Although he does not go into detail about that last item, he states that the details are evident to the wise. If this is indeed the meaning of the song, it ...


5

אם יש את נפשכם לקבור את מתי מלפני I think "nefesh" / "soul" can sometimes mean "will" or "desire." "From whatever your desire; if you say it's A, then it works, if you say it's B, then it also works."


5

והלכתא Vehilchasa This term is used by the Amora himself to indicate what the law is even though he personally holds of the opposing opinion. If the Gemara itself was stating what the law was , then it would state " this is the law even though it contradicts the Amora". Look in the Rosh in Avoda Zara Fifth Perek #34 . Yad Malachi 252. Instruction: 1. ...


5

The Tosafot there (Shabbat 12b) writes that only the angel Gavriel knows Aramaic. This is probably the angel that taught Maran. EDIT: I found a Ros"h in Berachot 2:2 that says it's not that they don't understand Aramaic, it simply is not favorable in their eyes. The Maadanei Yom Tov (note 7) ask a question that I won't bring up, but I will bring down what ...


5

In my Yeshiva experience I have always heard Nafkah Minahs (or Minot). Example: "Really? So what are the Nafkah Minahs" But I must say that usage of this plural form is rare.


5

The root of the word is צלי, which means "to turn" or "incline", and which has the sense of "pray" in many passages. For the former, see the Targum on Psalm 102:12 (where it corresponds to the Hebrew word of root נטה), and for the latter see Targum Onkelos on Genesis 12:8 (where it corresponds to the Hebrew word of root קרא). When it means "pray", it is ...


5

My fellow yeshiva bachur studied Aramaic intensely, and could hold a fluent conversation (if he had anybody to speak with). He said it should be אוֹרִייַתָא.


4

My understanding has always been: "ממה נפשך" literally means "From what your soul/self," which is short for "[You may interpret this] from what[ever approach] your self [prefers]." The closest entry in The Practical Talmud Dictionary is for "מה נפשך," which R' Frank translates as "What is your desire [to say]?!" or "Which position would you adopt?!" - a ...


4

Although קרח can refer to frost, in certain instances it refers to ice and is translated as such by Artscroll as well as Mechon-Mamre, like Iyov 37:10, Yechezkel 1:22, and Tehillim 147:17. Also, I noticed that that mechon-mamre translates יתלכדו of Iyov 38:30 as "frozen" even though Artscroll translated it as "imprisoned". On the other hand, Artscrol ...



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