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9

The requirement to kasher burners is mention in RM"A (451 law 4). Mishna Brura (note 34) states that it isn't really necessary, since food absorbed by one utensil cannot pass to a second utensil just by touching one another (there needs to be hot liquid involved). Furthermore, even if some food spilled on to the burner, it likely burned up completely. ...


8

Source: The Weekly Halacha Discussion Per Igros Moshe Orach Chaim 2:68, and Shmiras Shabbos K'Hilchoso 31:1 a non Jew may open the fridge for you due to Psik Reishei. Closing the fridge will cause the light to go off and is therefore prohibited. In a case where that it is a "Hefsed Meruba" large loss if the fridge remains open you are allowed to get a non ...


7

"Your intention is to take out food, not turn on the light." Unfortunately good intention only gets you so far. The Gemara says all agree you can't say "oh I just wanted to cut off the chicken's head because my kids like playing with chicken heads; my intention wasn't that the chicken should die!" (This argument is known as psik raisha, or "severed head"). ...


7

See Igros Moshe OH 1:128 (last paragraph) where R. Moshe refuses to answer regarding the permissibility to turn off the gas on yom tov. http://hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=916&st=&pgnum=221


7

Usually it involves making sure it's thoroughly cleaned, then boiling water in it for several minutes. (Warning: the water could theoretically superheat, so be careful.) From the OU: "How is a microwave oven kashered to change the dairy or meat status, or to kasher from non-kosher use? A microwave can be kashered by placing a bowl of water in the oven. ...


6

Adding to Barry's answer: Year-round, this isn't so clear-cut. I believe Chabad-Lubavitch's practice is to have separate burners. Rabbi Hershel Shachter (mp3 link) quotes his mentor as telling students, "when you get wealthier, you should buy separate stoves." Even for Passover, I looked at the Chicago Rabbinical Council's guidelines, and it doesn't ...


5

In general, with any question about writing and erasing Hashem's name it is useful to check the halachos of writing and erasing on Shabbos, because there is a lot of overlap. R' Moshe paskens that playing Scrabble on Shabbos is neither writing nor erasing, unless you're actually sticking them in their place like some deluxe sets. In that case he says one ...


5

Nitei Gavriel (Hilchot Yom Tov, volume 1, chapter 21, paragraph 4) says: ‫ד. מותר לשים ביו״ט קדירה של מים ע״ג האש כדי שיעברו על‬ ‫שפת הקדירה ויכבו את האש מתחתיו, אכן יש לו להשתמש במים‬ ‫לבישול קדירה וכדומה דהו״ל לצורך יו״ט, ודוקא במקום צורך כגון‬ ‫שמפחד שהילדים יתקרבו להאש, אז מותר למלאות קדירה מים, כדי‬ ‫להרתיח על האש לצורך שתיה, בכוונה שהמים ...


5

See here where almost the exact same question is asked Some concerns: Could the taste of milk become transferred from the grate or stove top to a meat pot or vice versa?  In other words when I place my milk pot on the grate right after my meat pot, does the milk pot absorb the taste of meat? May I eat food that falls between the grates or on ...


5

Consult your local Orthodox rabbi. But, to possibly point others in the direction of interesting answers, I have heard it argued that a microwave is considered akin to toledat ha-chama. See here and here. In terms of cooking on Shabbat, there seems to be one understanding that it is merely a shinui (e.g. Rav Moshe Feinstein); and another understanding that ...


5

Rabbi Dovid Ribiat writes in his Sefer Lamed Tet Melachot - The 39 Melachos Vol. 1 Section 1/Chapter III/E)/a/2 (Chapter 3 - Muktza Page 51): An electric fan may be moved or adjusted if it is needed elsewhere. For example, the fan may be moved to blow in a needed direction (while being extremely careful not to accidentally pull the plug). This is based ...


4

TL;DR: Consult your LOR. The CRC's website has a convenient chart of items that need toiveling, and for those that can't be toiveled, what should be done. For example: Coffee Maker - Glass parts - Tevilla. Machine - "clean well, do not use for 24 hours, and then run through one cycle" (Note that the CRC includes this paragraph:) Under no ...


4

It would also seem to me that WAF's remark is correct and it must have been Yom Tov. If I am understanding the molecule aspect of the explanation correctly - it would seem that it's being distinguished from a solid stick of wood where it can only be taken in and out of a fire as a whole unit. Therefore, it would seem that the gas would still parallel a ...


4

The following is a quote from http://www.dinonline.org/2010/05/30/cooking-in-the-garbage-bin regarding using the same garbage bin for both meat and milk, which I think is directly relevant to your question: In answering this question, it is important to note that although various authorities quote the concept of a davar gush (solid body) as being ...


4

#1 seems OK. The issues here are cooking and the usage of timers. There is no cooking problem for that which remains in the oven for 2 separate reasons: The food is cooked and The oven is off If the food would be uncooked and the oven on, you would effectively raise the temperature when you close the oven door thereby cooking the uncooked food ...


3

You wanted to know, why some people might be machmir on this: From InstituteforDayanim.com Kashering a microwave for Pesach is impossible since only metal or wood can be kashered for Pesach. Although one can kasher plastic the rest of the year, one should not do so for Pesach. The inside of a microwave is generally not metal and is thus not kasherable. ...


3

Regarding question 2 http://www.star-k.org/kashrus/kk-cooking-ovenshabbos.htm My oven and warming drawer have a delayed start timer feature. May I set it to go on Shabbos morning and place the food to be heated there on Shabbos before the pre-determined time? No. The food should not be placed there to be heated on Shabbos.


3

According to the 2014 OU Jewish Action Passover Guide on page 14 under "Libun (Burning)" On Line THE KASHERING PRIMER – PASSOVER 2014 A self-clean cycle of an oven(approx 850 degrees F) also qualifies as libun I have done it but it can also mess up some utensils. I was also been given this advice by the Baltitimore star-k, when I called the office.


3

See Shabbos Kehalacha (vol. 2 12:39-42). Borer is not a problem if you don't want either thing but just want to separate them in order to dispose of them properly. (For example separating recycling from other garbage, papers for geniza from papers for garbage, Shemita fruit peels from other fruit peels to throw out). Similarly here were you don't want either ...


3

http://www.ok.org/Content.asp?ID=115 The Sink: Separate sinks for washing dishes and preparing foods are recommended. If the two sinks are adjoining, there should be an effective separation between them so that no water or food splashes from one sink to the other. If there is only one sink, it may be used after it has been completely ...


3

You're not clear about what, exactly, bugs you regarding the Yom Tov mode. There are two aspects here: The fact that you are causing the oven to operate, and the pressing of the buttons that provide information to the oven's computer. Rav Heinemann has a teshuva (link) explaining his reasons for permitting this. Very briefly, the causation aspect is not an ...


3

The standard advice here is yes, just leave it on for the entire yomtov. Sorry, we're not magicians here that can hey presto improve on the wheel, so to speak. If you really, really wanted to put it on a time switch (/grumble/), I suppose you could, though that would have your oven clock blinking all sorts of funny times throughout yomtov; you'd have to ...


3

It's debated by contemporary poskim (and can come up in many dairy restaurants that use a microwave to make eggs). From what I've heard (a friend of mine spoke to the OU's Rabbi Genack, who asked RSZ"A, if I recall correctly), R' Shlomo Zalman Auerbach held it was a problem (though he does not consider the microwave to be cooking vis-a-vis shabbos). My ...


3

Rav Aharon Kotler said that covering the knobs of the stove accomplishes what garuf & katum accomplished with coals. So in the sense that this is without what we would call a blech, this is indeed without a blech. Rav Moshe Feinstein is strongly against this, and most people in America today follow R' Feinstein alone, or the stringency of both, meaning ...


3

You assume it requires kashering. The Star-K says you can use any microwave so long as it is clean inside, you are heating only the kosher item alone, and the item is on a thick plate. You don't even need to cover the food. http://www.star-k.org/kashrus/kk-cooking-microwave.htm


2

Firstly, an appliance made by a Jew doesn't need to be dunked in a mikva. If you can "break" and then "fix" the appliance yourself, that works. (What's called "breaking" and "fixing"?) I've seen some electric pump pots that say on them "made by a Jew, doesn't need dunking in a mikva, don't dunk me!" But otherwise, here are three answers I've heard from ...


2

From investigating AGA ovens, in theory there is no problem in kashering them. In practice it's gonna be quite complex. They have a ton of areas, and they are massive with a lot of thermal mass. In order to kasher them, you have to heat them up quite hot, but because of the thermal mass it's going to take a huge amount of energy and a very large flame. It ...


2

I don't have a source for this, but I have heard that in such a situation, it would be permissible to ask a child to hold the refrigerator door open so that the light would not be turned off on Shabbos. Naturally, it is expected that the child will eventually run away and the door will close. You still wouldn't be able to open the refrigerator again that ...


2

I checked with my LOR tonight about the tea urn and he said that while it would be good if no chametz has touched it during the year (and it was kept away from where there is chametz), it would be better to have a different urn for Pesach. The main reason is that it is quite easy for chametz to have gotten on the urn sometime during the year. I asked my LOR ...


1

(I know this answer is late.) According to http://www.daat.ac.il/daat/english/journal/broyde_1.htm the reason the Star K allows Yom Tov mode is that Rabbi Auerbach holds that electricity is permitted on Shabbos, as long as no light or heat are produced. And on Yom Tov heating is allowed, so the oven is permitted as long as you don't change the display ...



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