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8

During the Second Temple Period, there were different sects with different interpretations of Judaism. The descendants of the Pharisees wrote the Talmud, which defined Orthodox Judaism as we know today. (What follows is from Rabbi Shneur Leiman's lecture on yutorah.org) The Dead Sea Scrolls belonged to a sect that was clearly not the Pharisees; it includes ...


8

As part of the Apocrypha, it's part of the Bible for Catholics, not Protestants. Try this lecture: http://www.yutorah.org/lectures/lecture.cfm/725302/Dr._Shnayer_Leiman/Inspiration_and_Canonicity:_The_Formation_of_the_Biblical_Text The simple answer is that Judaism regards the Age of Prophecy as having ended about 2400 years ago, with Israel as a vassal ...


7

You question's a little unclear (to me) but if you're asking (as l ' suggests) I understood that interaction between God and man in the form of miracles done by the former ended along with the canon, yet we see such outside of the canon! then the answer is simple: Your premise is wrong. God has done many miracles since the times of Tanach. There are ...


6

Ben Sira was a matter of dispute in the Talmud if it may be studied. Rebbi Akiva includes in the Mishna's list of those who have no portion in the world to come (Sanhedrin 90a) ר"ע אומר אף הקורא בספרים חיצוניים Also someone who reads external books The Gemara (100b) quotes the opinion of Rav Yosef: בספר בן סירא נמי אסור למיקרי It is also ...


6

In the Artscroll book on Chanukah, Rabbi Hersh Goldwurm writes that while many ancient chroniclers follow the timeline of Megillas Antiochus, "most contemporary Orthodox historians" (including R' Yitzchak Isaac Halevi, author of Doros Harishonim) follow the timeline provided by I and II Maccabees. He also writes that R' Yaakov Kaminetzky concurred with this ...


5

The perspective of Orthodox Jews vis-a-vis the Dead sea scrolls varies from non recognition, ambivalence, to outright excitement. For those who do not view it as a life altering find see them as 1. Either a validation of what was already known to them ie. Small variance in textual differences due to a very solid mesorah. 2. the other non canonical scrolls ...


4

According to Wikipedia, no.


2

According to Vermes, every book of the Tanach was represented by fragments except Esther, probably because it involved a Jewish woman intermarrying with a gentile king. The reason the already-written Maccabees book would definitely NOT be found there is that the Dead Sea sect was absolutely opposed to the Maccabean/Hasmonean High priests. The background of ...


1

There's a version online here. It seems that they have a few different translations from the drop-down menu (the one on display is KJV).


1

There are several books called "Maccabbees," and they're pretty much unrelated to each other. They also written across a wide time span. Only the first book (IIRC) would have been composed in time for the Dead Sea Sect to have it in it's collection. But since they were an isolationist sect who weren't too pleased with the monarchy and the priests, it ...



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