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2

Actually, it does. Just not in a faulty translation. In the Hebrew it says "Four tzon for a seh." Tzon means flock of sheep-or-goats, and seh means a young sheep-or-goat. So the penalty for a goat is 4x, just like for a sheep. Similarly in Deut. 14:4. "The following animals are kosher. An ox, a sheep-seh, and a goat-seh ..." The Passover "lamb" ...


-1

There are inferences in scripture that can be interpreted that actions of animals have moral value. And even when scripture speaks of their actions not having moral value, it puts them on the same level as humans who don't have moral value. Genesis 6 11 And the earth was corrupt before God, and the earth was filled with violence. יב וַיַּרְא אֱלֹהִים ...


1

to add a bit to msh210's answer as to why animals don't sin, here's a quote from the Duties of the Heart part 2 (one of the classic works on jewish philosophy) It is through the understanding that we realize the Creator's wisdom, power and mercy, of which the universe provides clear evidence. It is the understanding which shows us that we ought to ...


0

This is, like ray's answer, just a proposal, but perhaps the reason that such animals exist isn't so that we can learn a moral lesson from them. I propose that they exist in order to maintain the delicate balance of life that allows us to survive. Without those animals, the world's ecosystems would look dramatically different and we would not be able to ...


3

The Babylonian Talmud (Sanhedrin 108 amud 1) says pretty much explicitly that animals cannot sin: וימח את כל היקום אשר על פני האדמה אם אדם חטא בהמה מה חטאה תנא משום רבי יהושע בן קרחה משל לאדם שעשה חופה לבנו והתקין מכל מיני סעודה לימים מת בנו עמד ופזר את חופתו אמר כלום עשיתי אלא בשביל בני עכשיו שמת חופה למה לי אף הקב״ה אמר כלום בראתי בהמה וחיה אלא בשביל ...


1

It is unquestionably cruel to destroy or relocate a nest containing eggs and/or fledglings. The problem is due to the fact that birds are relatively stupid. Whereas, if I moved your house a short distance from its current location, you would obviously look for it and quickly find it, birds don't work this way. If a mother bird is out looking for food, ...


0

Since the link in Gershon Gold's answer no longer works and I have been unsuccessful at finding any other information online, I decided to email the Temple Institute in Jerusalem. This is a quote from the email I received back: Previous candidates for parah adumah have been disqualified after having grown more than two non-red hairs. A parah adumah born ...


0

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YKVlMMbTI9s [WARNING: Video contains actual depiction of idolatrous rituals] It does not "work" and it should absolutely not be performed. It is a clear act of darkhei emori according to Rav Hai Gaon, the RambaM, the RambaN, the Beth Yosef, and others. And if you can watch the link above and tell me that "the Satanists ...


1

See The tur in 605 He also says That even though a domestic animal (not a bird) is more expensive than a rooster is preferred becouse it is called "gever" (also meaning man (see yuma 20b))... See the maharal m'prag's book נתיבות עולם - נתיב הבטחון - פרק א 60b and it continues to the next page on the next page To summarize one of the ways to ...


1

It's not that horses were exclusive to Egypt. Rather, Egypt was the source of the best and most sophisticatedly bred horses and would constantly look towards egypt to maintain his menagerie. A king with many horses make himself dependent on Egypt just as a country with many cars would be dependent on Saudi Arabia or Iran vayimach shemam. Sources: Little ...


1

Tishre 1st of Tishre - The new year for animal tithes -- Animals born in one year do not combine with animals born the following year - Rambam, Hilchot Bechorot 7:6 10th of Tishre - Shofar was blown on the 10th of Tishre on a Yovel Year to signal the freeing of the slaves - Vayikra 25:9 15th of Tishre - Chag Ha'Asif -- Celebrating the ingathering of the ...


5

tl;dr: There is some basis for the Christian interpretation in Jewish sources, but it is not the only reason for the prohibition. In the Bavli it is stated: ת"ר החוסם את הפרה ודש בה לוקה ומשלם ד' קבין לפרה וג' קבין לחמור(Bavli Bava Metzia 91a) Our Rabbis taught: If one muzzles a beast and threshes therewith, he is flagellated, and pays [to the ...


0

Dog food is typically not Kosher. That's OK. One's dog does not need to be fed Kosher (compare with Shemos 22:30). However, that does not exempt the requirement to keep the food away from Kosher dishes. The exact details of "away" are a bit beyond this answer, but it would have to be kept away just like any other non-Kosher food, even though you are allowed ...


0

You'll need to make sure that it's not meat and milk together, because it might have the issur of hano'oh (prohibition of having benefit) that applies to it. For a much more in depth answer, check this out: http://www.torah.org/advanced/weekly-halacha/5763/tetzaveh.html


0

The dog food is not Kosher, and should therefore not be prepared in an area or with vessels that you want to keep Kosher. Be especially careful, if anything needs to be warmed up. If it gets on your dishes or counter-top you should probably speak to your local Rav and ask what to do, though if it is cold and you completely remove it, it should not make too ...


2

I asked this question to one of the rebeim in my grade school and he answered that the passuk was going down the list based on how common the subject was. Children are most commonly found, servants less so, animals even less, and finally geirim which were the least common.



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