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Tzaar Baalei Chayim is permitted for human benefit, even monetary loss. The Gemara in Shabbos allows leaving heavy bags on an animal when the alternative is to cut the rope, allowing the packages to fall and break. We also find in Avoda Zara how they used to de-hoof an animal when a king died, in some form of honor. How to weigh the significance of the ...


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While it is true that the Torah weighs every word and that many important Halachos are learned from minute hints, the Torah doesn't shy from verbosity when something is to be learned from it. An example of this is the story of Eliezer's journey to find Rivka. The depiction of her giving him to drink is repeated three times: in his prayer, when she does it, ...


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I don't think so. I was studying in Israel when I found myself in that situation and asked one of the rabbis (don't remember which) then present at the Shalom Hartman Institute, who advised me to pray my own words from my heart. (I did, and made it home in time without adding to my pet's suffering.) I modeled what I said loosely on the various conclusions ...


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Not that I'm aware of. But Jewish law traditionally has a high value on concern for animals' pain. So perhaps something like: Almighty God, Whose mercy is on all His creatures; You commanded us not to stand idly by when a donkey is suffering from a crushing burden, and thus it's heartbreaking for us to see our pet suffer like this. We beseech You to ease ...


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Yes, you must cover them where snakes are common. The Shulchan Aruch Yoreh Deah siman 116 siff 1 says explicitly the leniency is only because snakes were not common amongst them.


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most likely the verse has nothing to do with a literal dog, but rather a male temple prostitute that was called a dog priest - they actually practiced sodomy in the temple as a male prostitute (they also had females doing the same) - the profits for thier services was given to the temple until they began claiming they could forgive sins through thier sexual ...


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Even though there is a prohibition of tzaar baalei chayim (causing suffering to animals) that is only the case when there is no overriding need. Thus, for instance, we kill animals for meat/clothing even though they inevitably suffer in the process. Removing a nuisance is no less an overriding need. (Otherwise, one would no be allowed to kill a mosquito.) ...


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In Devarim they're listed the way you suggested, all in one posuk. Daas Sofrim says (http://www.hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=39783&st=&pgnum=169) that in Vayikra they're given each their own posuk to stress the issur because these animals were commonly eaten, and also because each one is on a different level in ruchnius (and Chazal say that ...


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The assumption behind this question is that every letter, every word and every verse of the Torah is measured out carefully. Thus, we see that from an extra vav, a halacha may be derived. When, in the discussions often found in the gemara, one Tanna interprets an extra word in one way to prove his point, we must take pains to explain how his disputant, the ...



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