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If I may post an answer to a similar question, there are different approaches within Jewish tradition as to the identity of the biblical serpent. (The first three here are quoted by the Ibn Ezra) It could be that the snake in the story is not literally a snake, but a metaphor for the Satan, or some similar evil force. This is the approach taken by r. ...


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First let me briefly address your use of "Satan". Another religion has an idea of "Satan" as being an evil godlike being or angel, one who is locked in a struggle with God between good and evil. That idea is not really part of Judaism. There is a role of "the satan", which might not always be filled by the same entity, but this is a servant of God, just ...


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Despite this being an old question, it recently came up in conversation, so I'll take a stab at it. Three of these sources (the exception being the Chizkuni, which I found myself) come from a footnote to Eliezer Brodt's article on ברכות הראייה printed in Yeshurun vol. 26 There are indeed a few commentaries that mention werewolves: Rashi, in his commentary ...


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The Lubavitcher Rebbe explains this here as follows: The playing represents the Supernal enjoyment from souls that connect the world with G-dliness (לויתן related to הפעם ילוה את אישתי - meaning connection), pleasure here meaning to emphasize the novelty of the matter, like the enjoyment one gets from seeing a parrot talking, even though it isn't able to ...


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IIRC, the Maharal, in Beer Hagoleh ch. 4, explains that the Leviathan is a symbol for the world's great materialism (as it's an enormous mass of flesh-life), and 'playing' is something that may be a source of enjoyment without fulfilling a need. Thus, God is described as playing with earthly materialism, because He doesn't need anything from His creations. ...


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The Talmud gets it from Tehillim 104:26: שָׁם, אֳנִיּוֹת יְהַלֵּכוּן; לִוְיָתָן, זֶה-יָצַרְתָּ לְשַׂחֶק-בּוֹ. "There go the ships; there is leviathan, whom Thou hast formed to sport therein." In Canaanite myth, the Leviathan (Lotan) is a dangerous creature whom Baal must slay. Thus: he name of a mythological sea serpent or dragon, personifying the ...


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The Maharal (Gur Aryeh ibid) explains that the Gemara which says that a person will surely die in a pit full of snakes and scorpions is only when it is full of snakes and scorpions, but this pit just had a few. The Ohr HaChaim explains that the brothers felt Yosef was deserving of death because he had testified falsely about them to their father in matters ...


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People were vegetarians before the flood; the change is noted in Gen 9. But food isn't the only use for sheep. Hevel probably kept sheep for wool, since after the expulsion from the garden (Gen 3:23) people needed to clothe themselves. (God made clothes for Adam and Chava (3:21), but it doesn't say he continued to do so for everyone else.) Additionally, ...


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Shepherds move herds. They help raise animals (which provide milk and wool, especially the sheep). There is nothing in the job description of a shepherd that requires killing animals.


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According to the various kashrus books that I have seen, Rav Hirsch, Rabbi Art Scroll, and others, a "split hoof" is a single covering of the bottom of the foot split completely in half (from front to back). Thus, the fact that the picture of the mouse deer shows four toes and not a single completely split hoof would mean that it is not kosher.


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According to Bikkores HaTalmud (Vienna, 1863, pp. 387-9), by Rabbi Yaakov Yechezkel HaLevi (cited by R Natan Slifkin here, page 10, and footnote 28), the "java mouse deer" is the shafan, which is classified as a non-kosher animal (Devarim 14:7). The same source posits that the "greater mouse deer" may be the arneves, which is also forbidden in the same ...


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Note that many translations have both a bat and an ostrich listed as "birds". As an example, Rabbi Aryeh Levin in Living Torah and the English translator in Rav Hirsch (his grandson Isaac Levy) use Bas Haya'ana as ostrich and ataleif as bat. These translations state that both an ostrich and a bat are halachically considered "of". Thus it appears that a bird ...


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No. No matter how would be classified: Fish: Scales could not be removed without ripping skin. Reptile, insect, animal (Behema/Chaya): Neither a grasshopper, nor split hooves. See picture below. Bird:* No mesora for Ashkenazim. For Sefardim, it would need simanim: Extant crop: Subject to observation of specimen. Peelable inner lining of gizzard: Subject ...


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I would think not, because they probably wouldn't be kosher animals. The basic requirements for being a kosher animal are laid out in Deuteronomy 14:6: וְכָל בְּהֵמָה מַפְרֶסֶת פַּרְסָה וְשֹׁסַעַת שֶׁסַע שְׁתֵּי פְרָסוֹת מַעֲלַת גֵּרָה בַּבְּהֵמָה אֹתָהּ תֹּאכֵלוּ And every animal that has a split hoof and has a hoof cloven into two hoof ...


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Let's see. What exactly are dinosaurs? For a long time, they have been considered lizards. Lizards are not kosher, due to lack of kosher signs. For the sake of argument, they might be mammals. In that case, they're still not kosher, as they don't have split hooves and chew their cud. (Also brought by Shokhet) What if they're birds? The Torah (Devarim ...


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Mishnah Parah 2:5 היו בה שתי שערות לבנות או שחורות, בתוך גומה אחת, או בתוך שתי כוסות והן מוכיחות זו על זו--פסולה. If it has 2 white or black hairs within one "depression," or within two "cups" in such a way that they clearly go together, it is invalid. The Mishna goes on to discuss other details, such as if the roots are red. Among other ...


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I have also seen that Yaakov was hinting that the bracha (which was mainly agricultural) had not helped him. The bracha from Hashem was in his flocks which had not been mentioned by Yitzchak. Yaakov was also hinting that everything he had was from the hard work and knowledge of husbandry which he had as well as a bracha from Hashem granted to him while he ...


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Ramban (verse 14) says it's because that's what he had at hand.


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In addition to DanF's answer, it seems there's a message in the gift. What do you get when you add twenty rams and 200 ewes? Well if you're really hungry, 220 mutton chops! If you're patient, though, you have a breeding stock that can produce thousands. If there's anyone who could play the victim card -- you ruined my life! -- it's Esav. Yaakov's message, ...


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There are two things that would contradict your assumptions in your question. 1 - Rashi on Breishit 32:14 cites a Midrash saying that Ya'akov included precious stones and diamonds. 2 - Breishit 36:6-7 states that Esav had a lot of herds / cattle and because he had so much the land was not big enough to hold both his and Ya'akov's cattle, which is one of ...



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