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The meforshim bring out that the initial creation of the animals was the appropriate amount for each species to be able to have a full existence. Thus,passenger pigeons, which could not survive as less than massive flocks were created in that number. Also, herbivores were created to be able to be in balance with the amount needed to eat the vegetation. ...


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In the Artscroll Stone chumash, there is a reference to R. Hirsch in 1:27 "although all living creatures were created male and female." But this might indicate some combination within a single entity. Rashi on 2:19 writes: It also teaches you here that at the time of their forming, immediately on that day, He brought them to man to name them (Avoth d’...


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This is an interesting question: The problem is with feces Feces of chickens you explain what is in contact and from what the smell comes. You say that shoes are in contact with feces but was washed, and the smell partially disappear. Are feces of chicken considered as a problem according to the Halacha? Yes and no! See Gemara Brachot 25a: לא ...


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There's a Gemara about the Kohen who described the size of his sacrificial bread in terms of "a lizard's tail." That was considered uncouth, as lizards aren't kosher. So we may prefer to compare people to kosher animals. Grasshoppers -- well technically they're white locusts --are the smallest kosher animal you'd encounter on land.


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I had thought the answer was "absolutely yes" (i.e., you cannot pet even your own dog on Shabbos), but I checked two of my Shabbos seforim and the Internet and found a bit of nuance. Volume 2, Part V of The Concise Code of Jewish Law: Compiled from the Kitzur Shulhan Aruch and Traditional Sources by Rabbi Gersion Appel says this: "All animals including ...


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In “The Halochos of Muktzah” page 118 Rabbi Bodner says that animals are muktza. On page 9, Rabbi Bodner says “Items which are muktza may not be moved or eaten. They may be touched, however, providing this does not cause them to move.” So you see that animals can be touched as long as that does not make them move. In “Shemirath Shabbath” Rabbi ...



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