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NOTE: I am not a science guy but found the following interesting. Copy/Paste from the Ohr Somayach "Ask The Rabbi" Far from being frightened by dinosaurs, Rabbi Yisrael Lifshitz, author of the Tiferet Yisrael commentary on the Mishna, received the news of fossil discoveries in the nineteenth century with delight. As he had undoubtedly expected, they ...


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I discuss some of the logical reasoning in Breishis - Creationism and Evolutionism Logically, we can consider Creation in a way like building a computer program from modules. Each "day" is a different module turned on and off for the unit testing. This is why the first time, when time is created, is יום אחד (one day) and the following days are of the form ...


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It is difficult to separate this answer from science. Ultimately the discovery, knowledge and theory about dinosaurs is a scientific one; one that is not really discussed in classic Judaic literature due to the discovery of dinosaur fossils begin relatively recent. Rabbi Slifkin has a chapter devoted to this in 'the Challenge of Creation' (chapter 17 ...


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According to Rashi's commentary on Genesis, the order of events presented therein is not to be taken literally. He concludes a long comment on 1:1 with: על כרחך לא לימד המקרא סדר המוקדמים והמאוחרים כלום Perforce, you must admit that Scripture did not teach us anything about the sequence of the earlier and the later [acts of creation]. He backs ...


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Shmos 4:3 When Hashem has Moshe throw his staff down, it turns into a Nachash. Here Aharon throws down his own staff and it turns into a Tanin. At the river, Moshe is told take the staff that originally was turned into a nachash on the mountain (his own staff) and warn Par'o. Then in sentence 19, Hashem tells Moshe to tell Aharon to take his staff and ...


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Besides the answer from @Jewels we have the answer from impure animals: present, future, past which actually mentions the llama specifically. The comment is Interesting explanation from a comment here: Gamal, Shafan, Arnevet are written in the Torah in the three tenses (past, present, future) and so refer to Bactrian camels (past, where Avraham came ...


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It occured to me while reading the Gen 1, that reptiles may be implied by the verses. First check out this answer. The exegetical approach used therein is the one I am attempting to use. Next, note the wording of verse 20, when water life and flying things are introduced: וַיֹּאמֶר אֱלֹהִים--יִשְׁרְצוּ הַמַּיִם, שֶׁרֶץ נֶפֶשׁ חַיָּה; וְעוֹף יְעוֹפֵף ...


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Llamas are members of the Camelidae family, and as such do not have split hooves, only two large toenails, as well as a soft padding behind them. An essential element in an animal being kosher is having split hooves, and hence are not kosher. As members of the camelid family there are presumably included in the verse under the general category of camels, all ...


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I understand from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Llama that the llama is a member of the camel family and so is not kosher.



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