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The Avarbanel here explains that god did that to warn bilam and make him understand that just as he can put whatever he wants in the ass's mouth , so he will do with bilam's mouth


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Rabbeinu Bechayei on Pirkei Avot 5:8 expands on the Mishnah citation that among the 10 things created during twilight prior to the start of Shabbat, is the mouth of the donkey that spoke to Bil'am. He states that all 10 things in the list were created for the honor of Israel. The main idea to be learned is that the donkey doesn't speak on its own, but ...


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found this the Zohar (3:10a) quotes an even earlier book by Rav Hamuna Saba of the 2nd temple era "The Entire earth and those around it, spin round in a circle like a ball, both that at the bottom of the ball and those at the top. All G-d's [human] creatures, wherever they live on the different parts of the ball, look different because the air is ...


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All sacrifices are, as explained by the ibn Ezra and quoted by the Ramban, to envision giving yourself up entirely to Hashem. In your place you send something from your possessions, and as you watch the whole Avoda you picture it being done to yourself. The theme behind all Mitzvos is that although we stress the importance of thought and heart, when we put ...


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Egyptians did not sheep worship or any animals. They were monotheists. The symbols represented different concepts of the creator. In this, the creator is praised through respect of nature. Shepherds were not allowed because there sheep would not only eat the herb of the field, but the sheep would pull the entire plants up from the root. This could have ...


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Bamidbar Rabba 9:34 has a story with Rabi Akiva who explained to a black king that his child was white not because his queen had been unfaithful, but because she had been focusing on white images while they were together. Rabi Akiva explained that this was the phenomenon behind Yaakov's treatment of Lavan's sheep in Bereishis 30. According to this ...


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There's a story in the Talmud - Shabbat 31a - about a guy who tried (unsuccessfully, as it turned out) to win a bet by provoking Hillel to anger. He posed three questions about phenotypic variations in certain human populations: מפני מה ראשיהן של בבליים סגלגלות א"ל בני שאלה גדולה שאלת מפני שאין להם חיות פקחות [He asked,] "What is the reason that the ...


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Shulchan Aruch introduces the laws of cross-breeding/cross-grafting species by saying that "two plants or animals may appear to be different, but are actually the same species but grew differently because of conditions or locations."


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Yes, the Issur involves any "Behema", including horses. See the Shulchan Aruch siman 246, a horse is explicitly mentioned in the Mishna Berura there, 33-34. The "Cattle" translation is a good example why you should try your best to avoid translations if possible...



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