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9

I would think that it is better, if possible, to incorporate group participation for these things as much as possible. However, even alone, one says "ואמרו אמן" and the like. Why? I will quote R' Yaakov Emden (regarding the phrase said at the end of the Amida to conclude "Elokai N'tzor"), but do not assume that I know what he means: .ואמרו אמן - אף ביחיד ...


8

Qitzur Shulhhan Arukh - Yalqut Yosef, Siman 109:6 states: ומי שמאריך בתפלתו באופן שהצבור מסיימים להתפלל ערבית, והוא עדיין בתפלתו, ובליל ח' לחודש שהצבור מברך ברכת הלבנה, מפסיד אמירת הברכה ברוב עם, יש לו להשתדל להתרגל לכוין מהר, כדי שיסיים את התפלה ויאמר ברכת הלבנה עם הצבור ברוב עם. אבל אם הצבור מתפלל יותר מדאי במהירות, והוא מתעכב לצורך כוונה הכרחית בביאור ...


7

Let's divide this into 2 catagories: a) Yesoma b) chatufa/ketufa Yesoma: The problem of an amen yesoma is for a person who requires the bracha for himself, but doesn't hear the bracha and merely answers amen. he hasn't fulfilled his requirement for that bracha. Others are strict to not answer amen at any time you did not hear the bracha [Shulchan Aruch ...


7

Avodah Zarah daf Samach Hei has Rava answering Amen after Bar Sheishach's comment of "The eye that wishes to see bad in you should pop out".


7

Yalkut Yosef (in Siman 55, #26): If the people are out of sync by more than toch k'dei dibur, then you answer each person when he reaches the right point in kaddish. If they're within toch k'dei dibur, he lists 3 options in the following order (I don't know how to decide between them): There are those who say you should wait until everybody finishes and ...


7

The Shulchan Aruch writes (OC 215:2) that one should not respond amen to a bracha recited by an adult Jew if שינה ממטבע הברכות he changed the way the bracha was coined. The Mishna Berura there notes that this is due to the fact that if he changed it too much that he would not fulfill his obligation, it is then a bracha levatala to which one is forbidden to ...


7

First of all, I have to correct a common misconception in your question: that one must say Amen in order to fulfill one's obligation in the blessing. This is only true if the one saying the blessing is not fulfilling his obligation then as well. In the vast majority of cases where the one saying the blessing is fulfilling his obligation with you, you can ...


6

See Mateh Moshe (2:338), who brings from the Mordechai that one should say "ואמרו אמן" at the end of the Harachaman section as an exhortation (אזהרה) to the others there to answer "amen" as a form of necessary respect to the host, similar to the end of the "Magdil" section, where we do the same as a form of necessary respect toward Hashem (the object of our ...


6

It's not unique. It's because it's the last blessing in a series. The same is true for bone (b'rachamav) Y'rushalayim after a meal and the final b'racha of Halel and p'suke d'zimra. Specifically, SA OC 215:1 has that we say amen to our own b'racha in each of these cases even without hearing someone else simultaneously, and I believe S'faradim follow this ...


6

The Mishna B'rura (O.C. 215:9) quotes a midrash in the name of Acharonim to say that one must say "amen" after "wishes" such as you mention - even those that do not include the name of God. From the context I would presume that this "amen" is subject to all the same rules as a regular "amen".


5

The Mishnah (Berachos 8:8) states that we answer Amen even after hearing a partial berachah from a Jew, but not from a Cuthean (who is suspect of having addressed the blessing to Mt. Gerizim, the site of their place of worship). This is codified as halachah in Shulchan Aruch (Orach Chaim 215:2). Mishnah Berurah there (subsection 6) records variant opinions ...


5

The biography preceding Igros Moshe volume 8 describes how an elderly Rabbi Moshe Feinstein heard wishes for a long life -- IIRC he was at a bris and they said "may you see his wedding!" He tearfully acknowledged it wouldn't happen, but answered amen nonetheless. Sforno says that Sarah assumed the mystery men's discussion of her birth was a human blessing ...


5

Luach Davar B'Ito 5771 page 283 says that you do not say Amein after V'leslichas Avon, you say Amein after V'lchaporas Pesha.


4

By the hadran said after a siyum this Posuk is followed by Amen (more than one ...)


4

I once asked a Rov regarding the Halacha of what to do in 770. There is one official Shacharis/Mincha/Maariv minyan ("the main minyan") and there are also side minyanim taking place under the Woman's section throughout the day. Between the "side" minyanim and the "main" Beis Medrash are mechitzos to avoid this issue However, there are times when people ...


4

Shouldn't be necessary. Better to focus on Talmud Torah. Source EDIT: For those who can't listen to the shiur, you should know that Rav Shlomo Zalman Aurbach rules in Halichot Shelomo 9:6 that one does not even need to stop to answer kaddish or kedusha when learning by one's self, let alone when participating in a shiur!


4

We see in many places that if one finishes a bracha before the shatz that he should say amen and that is recommended (SA OC 51:1,59:4. Saying amen prior to finishing the bracha is debated, but only due to the interruption. A possible reason for the distinction between the cases is that saying amen to my friends bracha is seconding my friend's bracha. ...


4

It is a long beracha, called the Birchat Me'ein Sheva. It starts with Baruch and ends with Baruch. The Mechaber Orach Chaim 268:8 writes that one praying alone should not say the blessing. The Ramah adds that one who wants to may do so, by skipping the beginning and conclusion of the blessing. The Be'er Heitev explains that this means the one praying ...


3

According to R' Soloveitchik, one should not answer Amen to the shatz's bracha on Hallel because of the issue you've raised. There seems to be a difference between birchos ha-mitzva and other brachos in this regard. The other case where it comes up is the bracha on sefiras ha-omer. (I don't have any source on hand for this, but I've heard it in R' ...


3

See OC 6 (4) and MB who records a custom that each congregant says the morning blessings and the others answer omain (without the intention to fulfill their obligation by saying omain). See MB s.k. 13, who mentions a supporting view and the view of the Pri Megodim that only the Chazzan should say these blessings aloud. MB says that each place should follow ...


3

In a diffrent context dealing with the same problem.Reb Ovadiah Yosef says in places like the Western Wall or very large shul where multiple Minyanim are held simultaneously that one should respond to Kedusha and answer "Amen" to the Berachot he hears. Even though he had already recited Arbit, there is no Halacha forbidding answering "Amen" or responding to ...


3

You would have to answer (see Ateret Paz 1:3: Hoshen Mishpat:14:1).


3

See http://www.torah.org/advanced/weekly-halacha/5762/naso.html


3

No, but if it is live yes (Yalkut Yosef, Helek 3, 215:4). However, over the internet it would be Asur (Q&A 91813 to R' Musafi). The reason is because the internet is a little off. Forgot to mention: Even if you both are Mechawen you can't be Yose.


3

Although if the shiur was live, it could be allowed (you don't need to hear the bracha to answer amein, like in the famous shul in Alexandria where they used to wave flags to tell people to answer Amein)


3

No - even in Shul you only answer Amein if it is done immediately or else it is an Amein Yesoma. Therefore you should not answer Amein if you are listening to a pre recorded Shiur. However if you are listening to a live Shiur then I do not know whether you should answer or not.


3

Well he only said a Posuk so why would you answer Amein? In regard to the issue raised as to this Pasuk being part of the Hadran at the end of a Mesechta and is followed by Amein If it was followed by the Kahal saying Amein then you would have a point. However it is part of the Nusach which the person who says the Hadran says, not the people hearing it ...


3

Disclaimer: this answer does not deal with the latest time for mincha. It assumes that the question refers to a time when one for sure cannot pray mincha. If it's really not the time for mincha at all then don't say Amen as the blessings are levatala. I can't prove this for late mincha specifically, but by a late shacharit, the Biur Halacha (OC 89 sv ...


3

From the Ben Ish Chai Parshas Vayachi : אות טו: … עוד נשאלתי שם בעשרה שלמדו תהלים ורוצים כלם לומר קדיש שאין שום אחד עונה והבאתי דברי הרב בני יאודה עייאש ז״ל סי׳ ג׳ והארכתי קצת בזה והעלתי דלכתחילה יזהרו להיות אחד עונה להם הקדיש׃ He cites the Bnei Yehuda Siman 3 who writes about this and says that in a case when all are saying kaddish and no one can ...



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