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11

There are 5 main avenues for finding a job in Israel. 1. LinkedIn Many people in Israel use linkedIn and there are many Israel centric groups for all sorts of fields. (Mostly related to "white colar" jobs) There are few manual labor or blue collar jobs on LinkedIn but there are some. 2. NefeshB'Nefesh's Employment Resources These resources will help ...


10

Is there anything wrong with this? Nope. The Rambam wrote a unique halacha (Melachim 5,10): "Great Rabbis would kiss the ground of Eretz Yisrael, and kiss its stones as well as roll in its dust as it states: because your slaves wanted its stones and begged for its dust." (from here) The Talmud records that Rabbi Abba would demonstrate his ...


9

One reason taught to me is that there is still work to be done in the Diaspora. You must take into account the contribution you can make and are making to the Jews in your country of origin, and what effect its loss might have on them. I remember my Rosh Yeshivah pointing out to us that Yeshivah bochurim are special and valuable members of the community. ...


8

There is also the halachic opinion of Rav Yehudah, quoted in several places in the Gemara (Berachos 24b, Shabbos 41a, Kesubos 110b-111a) that it is in fact forbidden to move from Bavel to Eretz Yisrael. He bases this on his understanding of Jer. 27:22 ("they shall be brought to Bavel, and there they shall remain until the day I am mindful of them"), plus ...


6

Mitzvos aseh seem to have different levels of chiyuv and 'exemptions'. In general, mitzvos aseh do not require one to spend an exorbitant amount of money to fulfill. Certain mitzvos have particular parameters for being fulfilled that can exempt a person when they are absent. For example, there is a mitzvah to eat and sleep in the sukkah on sukkos. Yet if ...


6

Again, according to Rabbi Yaakov Emden, you keep 1 day if you're in Israel right now, no matter where you come from or where you intend to be. If you follow his opinion, this question is moot. The prevalence of this opinion has had a resurgence in recent years, especially as we all move around so much, no one really is "of" a specific place like they used to ...


6

Yes. Israel's Law of Return says that Every Jew has the right to come to this country as an oleh. and defines "Jew" as a person who was born of a Jewish mother or has become converted to Judaism and who is not a member of another religion. (emphasis mine)


6

From what I have seen there are 3 or 4 popular times to move to Israel. -Right before or right after January 1st. This is done mainly for tax purposes so that it is easier on your mind to remember when things are do for which country and you don't feel all confused. However this does not work well if you have children that need to enter the school system. ...


6

This Mi Shebeirach was authored in 1948 in Morocco for those that were making Aliya. מי שבירך אבותינו הקדושים והטהורים אברהם יצחק ויעקב משה ואהרן דוד ושלמה הוא יברך וישמור וינצור כל אחינו בני ישראל אנשים ונשים וטף זקנים וצעירים ההולכים בים וביבשה ובאוירון לעלות לארץ אבותינו. מלך מלכי המלכים ברחמיו ישמרם ויחיים, ומכל צרה וניזק(!) יצילם. מלך מלכי ...


5

Off the top of my head: Rabbi Pruzansky (http://rabbipruzansky.com) of Teaneck, NJ's Bnai Yeshurun is a great promoter of Aliyah in his community. Rabbi Avi Weiss of the Hebrew Institute of Riverdale (NY) (http://www.hir.org/) is also outspoken about the importance of Aliyah. Rabbi Lopatin of Anshe Shlomo B'nai Israel (http://www.asbi.org/) spoke for many ...


5

Conditions in Israel at the time were generally worse than they were in Bavel. The Romans empire (especially after it converted to Christianity) treated the Jews much worse than the Persian government did. In Bavel, the Jews were granted a certain amount of autonomy and freedom, which allowed them to study and keep the Torah without persecution.


4

Read this moving story which I find very relevant to your question. The story is told by a holocaust survivor who came to deeply regret not heeding to Rav Kook's begging of him to make Aliyah in the 20's. The story suggests that the Halachic criterion for a Ben Eretz Yisrael is only the wholehearted decision to live in Eretz Yisrael. As has been pointed ...


4

Israemploy has a great LinkedIn group, very active. Though I would say that in the most part, the same resources that are good for looking for jobs are applicable to finding one in Israel, anyway, LinkedIn and personal networks chief among them.


4

Just to add to the many opinions already brought down, Hacham Ovadia Yosef, in Hazon Ovadia Hilchot Yom Tov footnote 22 of Hilchot Yom Tov Sheni Shel Galuyot (and likely elsewhere) writes that a single man or woman from Chutz La'aretz who is old enough to get married can keep one day while in Israel. He combines the shita of the Hacham Tzvi and Shulchan ...


4

Cultural adjustment, particularly for children of school age. It's my anecdotal understanding that there is no clean equivalent of "working right-wing Modern Orthodox/'black hat'" in Israel, so unless one is internally ready to become Dati Le'umi or Haredi, moving there means putting yourself and your family in a position where they will not fit in. This is ...


4

When asked why he doesn't visit Israel Lubavitcher Rebbe answered that once he visits he won't be able to leave (which would be an issue as the Ohel of the Previous Lubavitcher Rebbe is in America, and as most Jews live in America, it would be more difficult to affect them from Israel). If one could conditionally make Aliya, he would be able to come ...


4

Give Nefesh B'Nefesh a call - 1-866-4-Aliyah. Since 2002 they have helped 33,000 People make Aliyah. (Including Jamie Geller in the post above) They have pre-Aliyah counselors, an employment team ready to help you find work and many other resources. Their web site is full of helpful articles about finances, employment, Israeli communities and the Aliyah ...


3

See this audio lecture from Rabbi Yehuda Herzl Henkin. He sets forth that many Rishonim felt that it was a good thing as it enabled many more mitzvas to be performed, and something incentivized by the Talmud (either spouse can demand the family move to Israel), but not necessarily a Biblical "thou-shalt." Maharam Rutenberg writes something to the effect of ...


3

From the words of the Malbim on Shas it would be an extention of the Torah law of keeping oneself out of danger. Again from the same Malbim: Because the "chain" must not be broken until they conclude Talmud Bavli. a. According to the Rambam, yes; according to Rashi (quoted in Lechem Mishne), only if there are Yeshivos. b. According to (above) Malbim, ...


3

I am not aware of any "After highschool Yeshivah" who teaches their students that they are now halachaically required to stay in Israel. I would presume then, that any "conditional aliyah" is really described as a "visit" and not as actually moving there. However, just because nobody teaches that publicly doesn't mean the sources support it. :)


2

The Maharatz Chajes discusses this in Maamar Torat Nevi'im, ch. 7: וכן ניחא נמי ליישב הא דלא מנו מוני המצות מה שאמרו חז"ל (כתובות קי"א ע"א) העולה מבבל לא"י עובר בעשה שנאמר בבלה יובאו ושמה יהיו עד יום פקדי אותם, והיינו דמצוה זאת היא היפך ממצות התורה שנצטוינו בשעת מתן תורה לרשת את הארץ ולהאחז בה, ואם לא היינו חוטאים היתה עדיין א"י מוחזקת אצלנו, וע"כ מצוה זאת ...


2

The first place to start is the shita of the Ramban, who writes in parshas Masei (33:53) that it is a mitzvas aseh. He also asks why the Rambam does not count this as one of the 613, which is something that the acharonim debate. The Megillas Esther holds that according to the Rambam there is no mitzvah bizman hazeh, while The Avner Nezer says that there is ...


2

One thing you have to consider when you discuss the people who were exiled after the desctruction of the first temple is that they were exiled to Bavel. Of all the places they could have gone to, they were exiled to a place where they spoke the language and were able to communicate with other people already there. That had a big impact on a lot of people. ...


2

From what I recall - it's been 23 years - you have 3 choices: Find a Jewish Agency in the U.S. where a Shaliach will help you make Aliya while in the States. It involved a Medical Check Up in my time. When you arrive here you have everything needed to be a full citizen without further ado. Hop on a plane and at the Ben Gurion airport inform the clerk at ...


1

I've heard that the first scholar to go to Bavel was Rav, sent by Ribbi Yehuda HanNasi. He opened up a yeshiva in Sura for the sake of the general population that resided there at the time, which was uneducated to a certain degree. He created his own talmidim. At little later, Shemuel broke off and started a yeshiva in Naharda'a (which I think may have been ...


1

4 of the Rabbis at the shul I grew up in (over the past 20+ years) have encouraged many people to make Aliyah. There was a big celebration done when people made the decision and many drashot emphasized it's importance. Out of an average size of 250 families per year, I can off the top of my head think of 13 families that made Aliyah, or have returned to ...


1

The Lubavitcher Rebbe advised many people against moving to Israel in order to benefit their present communities, see this link for a clear presentation of this topic, sources included. http://a-farbrengen.blogspot.com/2009/01/rebbe-on-moving-to-eretz-yisroel.html


1

There is a broad range of "personal considerations" -- the cultural-adjustment issues for kids raised by @yitznewton, but also: caring for elderly parents who will not go with you custody factors if you are divorced change in quality of life due to employment changes (you can't find comparable employment, only much lower positions) if you are ...



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