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Rabbi Reuven Margolis writes in Margolis HaYam to Sanhedrin 22a that archeology has revealed that even the Assyrians did not use Ksav Ashuri (which might literally mean "Assyrian script). He was writing in the 1970's and I don't think that the situation has changed since then. The Talmud (there) offers three opinions as to whether the Jews originally used ...


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The Alphabet was used by the Babylonian and Persian Empire. We have pleeenty of examples of this script being used by non-Jewish, non Hebrew writers in the Babylonian (and later Persian) kingdom. The Aramaic and Phoenician alphabets continued to develop and so the letters continued to have slight evolutions. A very common Alphabet that we have records of is ...


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Hidāyat al-Qāriʾ (see Eldar's edition) indicates that the regular resh pronunciation was articulated at the middle of the tongue. This is farther out than the articulation for fricative gimel (IPA: ɣ) or the fricative kaf (IPA: x), which was articulated "at the back third of the tongue". This suggests that resh had an advanced uvular articulation. It is ...



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