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11

On chabad.org it says the following: On the way out of the cemetery, it is customary to pull out some grass, throw it back over the shoulder, and recite the passage below. This symbolizes the Resurrection of the Dead in the era of Moshiach, when the body will awaken and return from the dust of the earth, as it is written, "And may they blossom ...


8

You asked: Is this a Jewish minhag? If so, what is the source for it? Yes. it is mentioned in the Kitzur Shulchan Aruch 199:10 - סימן קצט - דין הקבורה ובית הקברות "The custom - when leaving a cemetery - is to pluck some grass and throw it behind one's back, and say זָכוּר כִּי עָפָר אֲנָחְנוּ - remember that we are dust." You asked: What does it mean? ...


5

After Sukkos is over (and you don't need them for mitzvah purposes anymore), collect your leftover aravah branches that you used for ד' מינים and הושענות. (You may also want to collect other's branches, because many people just leave their הושענות in shul when they're done with them -- that's another 5 branches per bundle!) Place the branches in ...


5

I've tried the paper towel/aluminum foil (my father's method) idea, keeping them in the fridge, and keeping them in water. One year I got a whole lot of them and experimented with around seven different methods for each pair, to see at the end of the week which method would be the best. The winner (and what I've been doing every year since then): wet them ...


5

It's actually a machloket haposkim (argument among the decisors), with the point of contention exactly that raised in the question. From the CRC: Some (Chayei Adam 51:17 & Nishmas Adam 152:1, Yechaveh Da’as 6:12, and Machzeh Eliyahu 25-29) hold that the bracha is shehakol because the wording of the bracha “Boruch…who creates the fruit of the earth” ...


4

You asked: Have there been any (scientific) studies that prove the benefits of Orlah? Well, as you will see from the answer to your second question, it's not about benefits. You can see from articles like this one that most fruit trees don't bear (real) fruit for the first 3 - 4 years. You then asked: What is the reasoning behind Orlah ...


4

The Chochmas Adam 89:1 wrote that the Vilna Gaon abolished the minhag of decorating the synagogue with trees in honor of Shavuos because of the problem of Chukkas HaGoy (i.e. the practice of decorating a tree for the Christian's Holiday). The Chochmas Adam held that such a problem would even justify nullifying a practice mentioned (but not commanded) in the ...


4

It's pure geometry. The simplest example of this in 3D is that the surface area of a hemisphere is double the surface area of a flat circle, so if you grow things on the surface you have double the area (wikipedia.org/wiki/Sphere). Area of circle = pirr Area of curved part of hemisphere = 2*pirr EDIT: Obviously, this is just a simple example to ...


3

Here is a picture (linked from here). There are several per tree.


3

See: אהלי שם : אוצר פסקי המועדים who writes that one who uses water grown plants has what to rely on, though ideally one should avoid using them. This comes at the end of a discussion (and list of sources) on plants grown in a pot. Seemingly, the same would apply to your other categories.


2

It's in the Kitzur Shulchan Aruch - in סימן נח - דין ברכת הריח. סעיף א': כְּשֵׁם שֶׁאָסוּר לְאָדָם לֵהָנוֹת מִמַּאֲכָל אוֹ מַשְׁקֶה קֹדֶם שֶׁיְבָרֵךְ, כָּךְ אָסוּר לוֹ לֵהָנוֹת מֵרֵיחַ טוֹב קֹדֶם שֶׁיְבָרֵךְ, עָלָיו, שֶׁנֶּאֱמַר, כָּל הַנְּשָׁמָה תְּהַלֵּל יָה. אֵיזֶהוּ דָּבָר שֶׁהַנְּשָׁמָה נֶהֱנֵית מִמֶּנּוּ וְאֵין הַגּוּף נֶהֱנֶה מִמֶּנּוּ. הֱוֵי ...


2

My father's solution: put them inside a moist paper towel, inside aluminum foil. After using them, leave them in the fridge, until you need them the next day. You might also consider replacing them half-way through, which is cheap if you buy them, free if you grow your own (which I do ;).


2

Years ago, my shul used spruce branches. They are fairly large, smell great and certainly stay green. One catch, perhaps, is that there may be certain varieties that shed more than others, so make sure that what you get is extremely fresh. In my area, a few Succah supply stores sold bundles of spruce branches, and I think Home Depot had them, as well. Most ...


2

My father used branches of a weeping willow. There happened to be one growing in a nearby yard. They stayed green long enough, and I never noticed any bug problems (although I was never so finicky, so I could have just missed them). If you are putting them over the bamboo poles, then you also don't have to worry about them drooping. If you find someone ...


2

Palm fronds work very well. My family uses them each year along with the bamboo. They get brown and the leaves fall off after sukkot, if they start green.


2

http://www.halachipedia.com/index.php?title=Aravot The Mishna (33b) writes that a dry aravah is disqualified, while a withered one is valid. The Rif (16a), Rambam (8:1), and Rosh (3:13) all codify this Mishna as halacha. To clarify the boundary described by the Mishna, Rambam explains that an aravah is valid as long as it is not completely dry. ...


2

Since the vegetables have grown (somewhat) during Shmita, then even moving them to a non-Shmita location, would not remove the Shmita status. If part of the vegie is Shmita, the entire vegie is Shmita. Source: Mishna in Shvi'is 6:3. Relevant parts of the Bartenura: בְּצָלִים שֶׁל שִׁשִּׁית שֶׁנִּכְנְסוּ לַשְּׁבִיעִית, וְיָרְדוּ עֲלֵיהֶם גְּשָׁמִים ...


2

I have seen a number of places that seem to say that hydroponics is mutar during shmittah. If this is the case for plants that normally grow in the ground (such as tomatoes), then the algae in your fish tank would also be mutar. The same question would apply to a fish pond. Note in the footnote below that there are those who say it is forbidden. Also I am ...


2

The Star-K cites an argument about this between Rs Tzvi Pesach Frank and Yechiel Michel Tukachinsky. For extensive discussion, see Derekh Emunah (Terumot 2:1 Beiur Halacha sv Ochel).


2

Rambam writes (Maachalos Asuros 10:11-12): ספק ערלה וכלאי הכרם בארץ ישראל אסור. בסוריא והיא ארצות שכבש דוד מותר. כיצד היה כרם וערלה וענבים נמכרות חוצה לו. היה ירק זרוע בתוכו וירק נמכר חוצה לו. שמא ממנו הוא זה שמא מאחר. בסוריא מותר ובחוצה לארץ אפילו ראה הענבים יוצאות מכרם ערלה או ירק יוצא מן הכרם לוקח מהן. והוא שלא יראה אותו בוצר מן הערלה או לוקט ...


1

As per Kitzur Shulchan Aruch 6 it would seem forbidden to pray there. סעיף ו' צוֹאַת אָדָם, אַף עַל פִּי שֶׁאֵין לָהּ רֵיחַ רָע, וְכֵן צוֹאַת חָתוּל וּנְמִיָּה וְצוֹאַת תַּרְנְגוֹל אֱדוֹמִי (תַּרְנְגוֹל הֹדּוּ) (אינדיק) מַרְחִיקִים מֵהֶן. וּשְׁאָר צוֹאָה שֶׁל בְּהֵמָה חַיָּה וָעוֹף, מִסְּתָמָא אֵינָהּ מַסְרַחַת וְאֵין צְרִיכִים לְהַרְחִיק מֵהֶן. אֲבָל ...


1

If I'm not mistaken, what you saw as "open/dispersed leaves" were, at one point, closed lulavim that later spread out. כך שמעתי.


1

According to a shmita gardening guide from the Israeli Religions Ministry, it seems that grass should be planted at least a month before shmita starts, as with a tree. They even recommend having it in before Tammuz, if i understand correctly. (See page 25 of linked document).


1

One of the requirements for schach is that it be something which cannot become tamei (impure), and therefore it cannot be a kli. In other words, it can't have been fashioned by a human with the intention of being used for something else. Therefore bamboo poles which were previously used for building a lion cage could not be used for schach. Every so often I ...


1

R Avrohom Yeshaya Karelitz (Chazon Ish Shevi'it 5:12) writes that were we to give Maaser Rishon nowadays to Leviyim on the basis that they claim the Levi Aliya in Shul, more people would lie and pretend to be Leviyim because of the financial benefit. However, most authorities seem to think that Maaser Rishon (taken from certain Tevel) should (at least ...



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