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5

After Sukkos is over (and you don't need them for mitzvah purposes anymore), collect your leftover aravah branches that you used for ד' מינים and הושענות. (You may also want to collect other's branches, because many people just leave their הושענות in shul when they're done with them -- that's another 5 branches per bundle!) Place the branches in ...


5

I've tried the paper towel/aluminum foil (my father's method) idea, keeping them in the fridge, and keeping them in water. One year I got a whole lot of them and experimented with around seven different methods for each pair, to see at the end of the week which method would be the best. The winner (and what I've been doing every year since then): wet them ...


2

Here is a picture (linked from here). There are several per tree.


2

Years ago, my shul used spruce branches. They are fairly large, smell great and certainly stay green. One catch, perhaps, is that there may be certain varieties that shed more than others, so make sure that what you get is extremely fresh. In my area, a few Succah supply stores sold bundles of spruce branches, and I think Home Depot had them, as well. Most ...


2

My father used branches of a weeping willow. There happened to be one growing in a nearby yard. They stayed green long enough, and I never noticed any bug problems (although I was never so finicky, so I could have just missed them). If you are putting them over the bamboo poles, then you also don't have to worry about them drooping. If you find someone ...


2

Palm fronds work very well. My family uses them each year along with the bamboo. They get brown and the leaves fall off after sukkot, if they start green.


2

http://www.halachipedia.com/index.php?title=Aravot The Mishna (33b) writes that a dry aravah is disqualified, while a withered one is valid. The Rif (16a), Rambam (8:1), and Rosh (3:13) all codify this Mishna as halacha. To clarify the boundary described by the Mishna, Rambam explains that an aravah is valid as long as it is not completely dry. ...


2

My father's solution: put them inside a moist paper towel, inside aluminum foil. After using them, leave them in the fridge, until you need them the next day. You might also consider replacing them half-way through, which is cheap if you buy them, free if you grow your own (which I do ;).


1

If I'm not mistaken, what you saw as "open/dispersed leaves" were, at one point, closed lulavim that later spread out. כך שמעתי.


1

According to a shmita gardening guide from the Israeli Religions Ministry, it seems that grass should be planted at least a month before shmita starts, as with a tree. They even recommend having it in before Tammuz, if i understand correctly. (See page 25 of linked document).


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One of the requirements for schach is that it be something which cannot become tamei (impure), and therefore it cannot be a kli. In other words, it can't have been fashioned by a human with the intention of being used for something else. Therefore bamboo poles which were previously used for building a lion cage could not be used for schach. Every so often I ...



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