The negative commandment of "lifnei iver lo titein michshol", literally "don't place a stumbling block in front of the blind", refers to the prohibition of misleading people.

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Issues of lifnei iver with an inaccurate clock

Is there any problem with lifnei iver (giving bad information) in having an inaccurate clock that someone else will look at? I'll examine a few cases here. The clock is a few minutes off. I don't ...
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Lifnei Iver for a chinuch-age child

Is there a prohibition of lifnei iver (causing or being an accessory to someone else's sinning) for a child who has reached the age of chinuch (education to mitzvos, the point at which he/she should ...
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Is Mi Yodeya allowed to tweet on Shabbos?

I recently signed up for @StackJudaism tweets, just to see what's going on here when not logged in. These tweets are automatically sent out by the Stack Exchange, which is done for every SE site. ...
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Is instigating a crime through careless choices of words a violation of Lifnei 'Iver?

I would like to look at the scope of Lifnei 'Iver -- the commandment to not put a stumbling block before the blind (Lev. 19:14). Specifically, I would like to know how one is punished for the sin -- ...
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When not a problem of lifnei iver, still mitzvah to be mafrish (seperate) from issur

Tosfos says in Shabbos Daf 3a that even when there isn't a problem of lifnei iver since the person would be able to get to the prohibited thing in another way, still there is an "issur d'rabbanan" ...
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Is a Reform convert considered not-Jewish or safek Jewish?

I am basing this question on something I read somewhere: that a non-Jew is able to accept the Torah and obligate himself in mitzvot independent of the bet din (court) conversion procedure. A non-Jew ...
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Sending emails to people who will read/answer them on shabbat

Is it permissible to send an e-mail on Friday afternoon, knowing it will be answered or at least read on shabbat by a Jew? I am inclined to think that, since the alternative to someone ...