Take the 2-minute tour ×
Mi Yodeya is a question and answer site for those who base their lives on Jewish law and tradition and anyone interested in learning more. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In the repetition of the Amida, it seems (see Teshuvos Igros Moshe 3 (9), OC 104 (7), OC 125 Biur Halocho d.h. "elo shoskin ..") that the Chazzan should say the pesukim of Kedusho loud enough so that someone who has not yet finished his own Amida can hear them and thereby fulfill his obligation. But some Chazzanim do not, especially on Shabbos and Yom Tov. What sources do they have to rely on?

share|improve this question
2  
I don't think the question is worded fairly. I think a more neutral question would be: "According to ... a Hazzan should recite the verses out loud. Are there any sources that say he should - or may - recite them quietly?" –  Seth J Aug 23 '11 at 13:12
    
I wouldn't say the Biur Halacha concludes so strongly in either direction. –  Double AA Aug 29 '12 at 23:03
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

In Rambam's text of the siddur (printed after the various laws of prayer, blessings, and the like, in the back of his code), he writes:

Scanned text of Rambam's instructions

The chazan says each one calls the other, and the congregation answers holy holy holy ... the chazan says by David, your holy anointed one, and the congregation replies G-d shall reign forever. And all the parts that the congregation recites, he says along with them. He should not raise his voice while they answer with him.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I once heard (I do not remember from who) that on Shabbos and Yom Tov since the Davening is done at a slower pace - in general people are holding along with the Chazan - and thus it is unecessary to say the Pesukim out loud.

It is also very possible that the Chazan is saying it out loud, however as there are often more people in Shul on Shabbos/Yom Tov and often they are Davening louder than during the week, it may be hard to hear the Chazzan saying the Pesukim.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.