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I'm trying to figure out a good way to say the Yiddish word באווארן in English. We used this a lot in Yeshiva, usually in the context of "to באווארן a question".

To explain:

A statement would be structured in such a way that it answers and negates a question before it is asked.

@IsaacMoses described it thusly below: A statement that includes information that undermines a challenge you might otherwise pose to that statement.

An example:

I could say that rice takes 20 minutes to cook. You would then ask, "what about brown rice, it takes 40 minutes?" I would then answer I meant white rice.

Or I could say that white rice takes 20 minutes to cook. By adding the word "white" to the statement, I made it clear that I wasn't referring to brown rice, and thus your question about brown rice was answered and negated before you asked it. By phrasing the statement that way, I באווארנט your question about brown rice.

Google Translate offers "guard", "watch", or "guarding", but none of that sounds right in this context.

The closest I've thought of is "anticipate", as in "The statement was structured in such a way to anticipate your question".

Other possibilities that come to mind are "obviate", "preempt", "negate", "address", "precede", but none of those sound right.

There must be an english word for this.

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what about 'protect' or 'secure'? As in you protect yourself from a question. Or I secured myself from your question. –  avi Aug 3 '11 at 6:05
    
@avi: It's closer to the dictionary definition, but it doesn't quite sound right when saying it. –  Menachem Aug 5 '11 at 1:39
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4 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I like "preemptively address".

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user795, Welcome to Judaism.SE, and thanks very much for this suggestion! Please consider editing your profile to give yourself a name. –  Isaac Moses Aug 3 '11 at 20:47
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My Yiddish dictionary has bavornt as "secure", "proof".

You can use it as a suffix as in vaser-bavornt, or follow it with kegn to say proof against...

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I was thinking that maybe the word 'prevent' would work while fitting in with the dictionary definition. As in: "The wording of my statement prevented you from asking a question". Kind of like you could say 'waterproof' could mean "secure against water damage", or "water damage will be prevented". –  Menachem Aug 5 '11 at 1:36
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Actually, there is an English phrase that seems very similar to this, although it is often misused:

To beg the question.

For the full and proper explanation, see this question on English.SE - What does the phrase “Begging the question” mean? :

a type of logical fallacy in which the proposition to be proved is assumed implicitly or explicitly in the premise.

(Though I guess the "Jewish twist" here, would be inverting the phraseology... Still, I think it's close enough).

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I don't think this is the same thing as Menachem described. He didn't describe a logical fallacy; he described a statement that includes information that undermines a challenge you might otherwise pose to that statement, which seems to be a logically sound device. –  Isaac Moses Aug 3 '11 at 10:57
    
No, he described a statement that includes information that undermines the statement that you did make, as a rhetorical question, challenging your statement. –  AviD Aug 3 '11 at 13:09
    
Wait, I realized I'm not sure about something here (I'm not familiar with the term...): is the באווארנט apply to the "what about brown rice, it takes 40 minutes?", or to the "white rice takes 20 minutes to cook"? –  AviD Aug 3 '11 at 13:11
    
@Isaac, I re-re-read it again, and realized I had it backwards (I think...) –  AviD Aug 3 '11 at 13:12
    
@AviD: the באווארנט applies to the "what about brown rice, it takes 40 minutes?". By adding the word "white" to the question, I made it clear that I wasn't referring to brown rice, and thus your question about brown rice was answered and negated before you asked it. –  Menachem Aug 3 '11 at 15:13
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"Anticipate" is exactly the word I would use. "Preempt" takes second place.

(These might not be exact translations -- but hey, did you ever try to translate the word mechutan?)

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