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When conducting a zimun with ten or more men, the nusach is to say "...ברוך אלקינו שאכלנו משלו".

I have noticed that many people, when saying the word "אלקינו", get up from their seats at least a little bit, similar to the respectful gesture many people do when the rav gets up to speak.

What is the reason (if there is one at all) for this practice, and what is its source?

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up vote 9 down vote accepted

It is said in name of Rav Chaim Soloveitchik that when we say Elokenu it makes the Zimun into a Davar Shebikedusha. That is the reason why some people stand when they say Elokenu, since according to some the Minhag is to stand during a Davar Shebikedusha. This Minhag is not universal. Sefardim do not stand by Kaddish in many cases.

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What constitutes a davar shebikedusha? –  jake May 23 '11 at 22:03
    
I guess something that is done with a Tzibbur and includes the name of Hashem, although I do not have a source for this. –  Gershon Gold May 23 '11 at 23:12
    
What about all the parts of tefilla that we sit down for? Particularly birchos k'rias shema and uva l'tzion which both have "kedusha" in them. –  jake May 23 '11 at 23:12
    
You are saying Birchas Kriyas Shema by yourself. You are not answering Amen to it. As I told you I have no source as to what constitutes a davar shebikedusha. –  Gershon Gold May 23 '11 at 23:14
    
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I heard once that the reason to half-stand is to satisfy all two opinions on the matter: those who hold it is appropriate to stand and those who don't.

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Kind of like putting up the mezuza diagonal. –  jake May 24 '11 at 2:45
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Just be careful of ending up satisfying neither! (@jake and @WAF) –  Double AA Dec 5 '11 at 19:53
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