Take the 2-minute tour ×
Mi Yodeya is a question and answer site for those who base their lives on Jewish law and tradition and anyone interested in learning more. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Here on Mi Yodeya, one can earn the "Fanatic" badge for visiting the site for 100 consecutive days.

Is it halachically possible to earn the fanatic badge in the Diaspora?

share|improve this question

migrated from meta.judaism.stackexchange.com May 17 '11 at 21:51

This question came from our discussion, support, and feature requests site for those who base their lives on Jewish law and tradition and anyone interested in learning more.

2  
Move back to main. This is a question about Jewish life and learning (are there 100 UTC days in a row on which m'lacha can be done), albeit worded in a meta way. –  msh210 May 17 '11 at 20:59
    
@msh210 Is this question relevant in any non-meta context? –  Isaac Moses May 17 '11 at 21:05
4  
@IsaacMoses: If it were worded "Physics.SE has a 'Fanatic' badge for those who visit the site 100 UTC days in a row. Is there an halachic way to earn this badge in the Dispora?" you'd allow it on main, wouldn't you? I mean, that's certainly not meta (on Judaism.SE). I don't see why the present question is worse. –  msh210 May 17 '11 at 21:22
7  
Now we're having a discussion about what belongs in the meta-discussion. . . –  WAF May 17 '11 at 21:55
2  

3 Answers 3

Now that we've moved the clocks, I realized that it's possible to do the inverse of @jake's answer from the eastern time zone: shabbat ended this week before 6PM, so if I'd thought of it I could have gotten credit for the day by visiting in that last hour (7PM EST = midnight UTC). Shabbat won't end after 7PM again until March 10, and there are no chagim in that stretch.

Update: I did that.

share|improve this answer

Well it's technically possible to write a script (and I'm sure there have been scripts written already), but an important thing to note is that the homepage doesn't count for a visit, as well as "similar pages" (source). [and there may even be more secret algorithms preventing something like that]

Of course, we would then have to analyze whether this would actually be permitted, and not some form of lying/stealing.

And, Computer working on Shabbos might apply here...

There's a nice looking calendar that you can access on your profile page (click on "x days" next to visited). Mine looks like:

visit calendar

No surprise there...

share|improve this answer
1  
also, it might be maris ayin –  Ariel K May 18 '11 at 4:52

Yes.

The website uses UTC time. Since I live on the west coast in the US, each "website day" starts at 5 PM. Thus, I simply visit the site after 5 PM on Friday, which during the summer months is not yet Shabbos, and then visit again before 5 PM on Sunday. As far as the website is concerned, I just visited on two consecutive days.

The only remaining problem is to find an 100 day stretch without Yom Tov Sheni. For this, the stretch between Shavuos and Rosh Hashana works. Tamuz + Av + Elul = 88 days + remaining days of Sivan = 111 days.

share|improve this answer
    
To get the 111 day stretch between Shavuot and Rosh HaShanah, you'd have to do it in a year when Tisha b'Av didn't fall out on a Sunday. –  Chanoch May 17 '11 at 23:28
3  
@Chanoch: why? You can't learn Torah on Tish'a B'Av, granted, but there shouldn't be anything wrong with visiting the site and reading some question about things that it's permissible to learn. –  Alex May 18 '11 at 19:10
1  
@Alex, or pop into Meta. On the way, you're likely to go through the main site too... –  AviD May 21 '11 at 22:15

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.