Take the 2-minute tour ×
Mi Yodeya is a question and answer site for those who base their lives on Jewish law and tradition and anyone interested in learning more. It's 100% free, no registration required.

When did Jerusalem first get an eruv for carrying on Shabbos? I've heard that Rav Moshe Feinstein pointed out that it didn't have one in Talmudic times. So when did they get one?

share|improve this question
5  
It was Mukefes Chomah it did not need one? –  SimchasTorah Mar 18 '11 at 21:09
add comment

1 Answer

Rav Moshe Feinstein could not have said that, since it contradicts explicit passages in the Talmud:

  1. Eruvin 6b:

    אמר רבי יוחנן ירושלים אילמלא דלתותיה ננעלות בלילה חייבין עליה משום רשות הרבים

    Rabbi Yochanan says: If not for its doors being closed at night, one would transgress for carrying in a public domain in Jerusalem.

    Once the doors were closed, Jerusalem had an "Eruv".

  2. Sotah 41a, Rashi "Mikan V'Elach":

    מכאן ואילך. לאחר שגמר כהן גדול לקרוא פרשה בברכותיה כל אחד מן הצבור מביא ספר תורה מביתו לעזרה דקסבר . אין עירוב והוצאה ליום הכפורים אי נמי ירושלים דלתותיה נעולות בלילה ומערבין את כולה

    After the High Priest finished reading publicly from the Torah, each one would go home and bring his private Sefer Torah to the Temple. Either the Gemara holds that there is no prohibition to carry on Yom Kippour or else Jerusalem's doors were closed at night and they had an Eruv around all of it.

  3. Bava Metzia 53b, Tosafot Dinfol Mechitzot - דנפול מחיצות

    Tosafot quotes - and agrees with - the Gemara quoted in Eruvin, discussing how the slaughtering knives could have been carried to the Temple on Erev Pessach that was a Shabbat.

share|improve this answer
2  
Strictly speaking, isn't this a comment and not an answer? Expected: Year. Found: Obviation of question. –  WAF May 12 '11 at 11:15
2  
@WAF I think leeway is in order here. The premise of the question was that there's some post-Talmudic year to respond with, but there isn't. –  Isaac Moses May 12 '11 at 12:22
1  
Rav Moshe may have meant a separate, explicit, "full-time" ערוב, the way we use the term today. Or, more likely, he may be being misquoted. –  SLaks May 12 '11 at 14:40
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.