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What are some words commonly mispronounced? (Not by elision/reduction (like ה׳‎→אדְני‎) or assimilation (like תזכרו‎→תשׂכרו‎), but rather words that are pronounced wrong simply because that's how people think they should be pronounced.) I'm excluding from this request errors in stress (emphasis), as those are, alas, too numerous to list. I'm including, however, words mispronounced in a person's own dialect (הברה), though others would consider them correctly pronounced. And I mean any "Jewish" word: a word relevant to, and mispronounced in, Jewish life, be it Hebrew, Yiddish, Aramaic, or other.

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closed as not a real question by msh210 Feb 5 '12 at 16:38

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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I'm not clear on exactly what you mean by "pronounced wrong simply because that's how people think they should be pronounced". Are you specifying that the mistakes have to be due to whim or that they have to be due to conviction? Does it matter if people have divergent convictions depending on context? (The first divergence that comes to mind is between colloquialism and Torah reading of the "same" word.) –  WAF Feb 21 '11 at 19:16
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@AviD, I don't know why you're saying havara Ashk'nazis is incorrect, but, in any event, yes, I mean to exclude things that are correct in havara Ashk'nazis and used therein. –  msh210 May 15 '11 at 3:46

37 Answers 37

אור Can be one of two words: "ohr" meaning light, or "ur" (or "eer" in hasidic havarah) meaning fire. These two meanings are different words and are pronounce differently, yet almost everyone I know always pronounces it "ohr", even when referring to fire.

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nagah, thanks for this great answer, and welcome to the site: I hope you stick around end enjoy it. –  msh210 Jan 1 '12 at 7:34

The bracha on spices is 'borei minei Vesamim' not 'besamim'.

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"zecher lemaase bereshit" in the "magen avot" of shabbos, should be "zecher lemaase vereshit"

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See also mi.yodeya.com/questions/6958 –  msh210 Apr 24 '11 at 5:19
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Even if it doesn't change the meaning of the word still it's a wrong pronunciation. –  jutky Aug 10 '11 at 6:10

This is a bit off, but sometimes discussing the case of "Toveling a Toister"

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I would add the conventional usage of " tovel" as a transitive verb in general. I "tovel", but I "matbil" a toaster. –  WAF Jul 18 '11 at 12:15

"Shalashudes" to represent Seudah Shlishis. (I know it's supposed to be a form of "Shalosh Seudos", but firstly, it doesn't sound anything like, and secondly, it's the third meal, not 3 meals!)

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I hear people say "Zachor et yom haShabbat l'kodsho" instead of "l'kadd'sho." לקדשו with a kamatz instead of a patach.

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In Kaddish,

יהא שמה רבא מברך (Y'he sh'meh rabba m'varach)

is frequently mispronounced

יהא שמה רבא מבורך (Y'he sh'meh rabba m'vorach)

switching the kamatz for a cholam in "m'varach."

(In Ashkenazi pronunciation, I also hear "m'voirach" instead of "m'vorach." Drives me crazy!)

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I think this could be because so many people who need to say Kaddish don't actually read Hebrew but instead use a transliteration, which, for reasons I still do not understand, use an 'o' for a Kametz when transliterating in Ashkenazi pronunciation. The 'oi' could also be an offshoot of that. I've heard people say "Yisroyel". -Shudders- –  Seth J May 12 '11 at 20:10
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So have I. I've heard Mevoirach and Yisroyel from those who are experienced as well. It's distressing. I do believe it has much to do with the transliteration using an 'o' for a Kametz, whether or not people are using the transliteration or glossing over the Hebrew. Once it's in their subconscious that Kametz is an 'o' it follows that some will pronounce it as such and that some will even pronounce it as 'oi'. I've heard people accidentally pronounce a Tav as an 's' despite the fact that it has a Dagesh. Usually this is corrected, as it's an accidental slip, not a regular habit, though. –  Seth J Aug 25 '11 at 17:37

I'm surprised no one has said this (maybe someone did and I missed it...): In An'im Zmirot, I hear a lot of people say Vayashvucha - וַיָשְוּוּךָ (they will compare you) instead of Vayshavucha - וַיְשַוּוּךָ(they will imagine you)

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It drives me crazy when feminine nouns ending in a "saf" are pluralized into male form e.g. "tallis" => "talleisim" (should be "tallisos"), "shabbos" => "shabbosim" (shabbasos), "machlokes" => "machlokesim" (machlokos), and of course the most ironic "ta'us" = "ta'usim" (ta'uyos)!

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Re talis see aishdas.org/avodah/vol07/v07n039.shtml#14 –  msh210 May 12 '11 at 16:07

The second pasuk in Sh'ma: ואהבת את ה' אל-היך... V'a-hav-ta should be pronounced mil'ra, not the almost universal "V'a-hav-ta". This is serious, because it actually changes the meaning - it should mean "and you shall love Hashem your G-d", whereas the mispronunciation renders it "and you loved Hashem your G-d". Reference: Rabbi Phil Chernofsky of Torah Tidbits.

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I recognize the reason for the downvote, but given the importance of the placement of the emphasis, I'm giving it back an upvote. –  Seth J May 12 '11 at 20:13

Bitya Bat Par'o instead of the common mistake of Batya.

Da-ni-yel instead of da-ni-el

ברוך הוא אלוהינו שבראנו לכבודו should be pronounce sheb'ra'anu (that He created us) and not she'baranu (that we created)

and a biggie. people say Ha'shem (with segol) instead of Ha'sheim (with a tzerei) causing a subtle but fundamental difference in connotation between it sounding like a personification of a person's name (Hashem said this and Hashem did that) versus the way it should be taken, a non-physical third-person entity: THE NAME.

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@DanielMokhtar, Welcome to Judaism.SE, and thanks very much for these excellent additions to this list! –  Isaac Moses May 11 '11 at 17:20
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Interesting points. But I don't understand the last one. What is the difference in meaning between "Hashem" and "Hasheim" (especially considering some don't differentiate in pronunciation between segol and tzere)? –  WAF May 11 '11 at 17:24
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@Zvi yes in my tanach as well. with a tzerei under the 'yud'. –  Daniel Mokhtar May 17 '11 at 20:06

עֲרָכִין‎ (the מסכת‎'s name).

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Often adopted by kids, or others who sing birkas hamazon emphatically. . .

Hashem y'varech es amo bashalom

as the last line, instead of

Hashem y'varech es amo vashalom

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See also mi.yodeya.com/questions/6095 –  msh210 Apr 24 '11 at 5:19

I have a strong suspicion (though no certainty) מחמת is actually מֵחֲמַת (mechamas), in which case it's widely mispronounced. Can anyone confirm or contradict me?

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The names of some letters of the alef-beis are commonly mispronounced, at least by Ashkenazim:

ב - with final /z/ rather than /s/
ד - with final /d/ rather than /s/
צ - with final /k/ rather than nothing (the proper name of the letter is "tzadi")
ת - with final /f/ rather than /v/

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bruchta, when people should say baruch ata H'

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"דּוֹר לְדוֹר יְשַׁתַּבַּח מַעֲשֶֽׂיךָ" instead of "דּוֹר לְדוֹר יְשַׁבַּח מַעֲשֶֽׂיךָ" in אַשְׁרֵי "

כִּי גָז חִישׁ וְנָּעֻֽפָה instead of "כִּי גָז חִישׁ וַנָּעֻֽפָה" in תְּפִלָּה לְמֹשֶׁה in psukei dzimra of Shabbos.

"נְרַנְּנָה בִּישׁוּעָתֶֽךָ, וּבְשֵׁם אֱלֹהֵֽינוּ נִגְדֹּל" instead of נְרַנְּנָה בִּישׁוּעָתֶֽךָ, וּבְשֵׁם אֱלֹהֵֽינוּ נִדְגֹּל in לַמְנַצֵּֽחַ at the end of shaharis weekday.

"וְאוֹמְרִים פְּעָמִים בְּכָל יוֹם" as opposed to וְאוֹמְרִים פַּעֲמַֽיִם בְּכָל יוֹם before korbanos everyday.

וָאֲהַלְלָה instead of וַאֲהַלְלָה in אַשְׁרֵי

חַלָּמִישׁ לְמַיְינוֹ מָֽיִם instead of חַלָּמִישׁ לְמַעְיְנוֹ מָֽיִם in הלל

וָאַשַׁלֵשׁ instead of וַאַשַׁלֵשׁ in רבוֹן כל העלמים said Friday night before אשׁת חיל.

Instead of כִּי כָּל אֱלֹהֵי הָעַמִּים אֱלִילִים I hear some people constantly say כִּי כָּל אֱלֹהֵי הָעַמִּים אֱלֹהִים in hodu of psukei dzimrah!

Even worse... וַיִרְאוּ הָעָם אֶת ד instead of וַיִּירְאוּ הָעָם אֶת ד!

and for now last but certainly not least one of my all-time favorites...

Instead of וּבָרֵךְ שְׁנָתֵֽנוּ כַּשָּׁנִים הַטּוֹבוֹת one guy I hear all the time says וּבָרֵךְ שְׁנָתֵֽנוּ כַּנָּשִׁים הַטּוֹבוֹת!

I have many more and can go on and on and on...

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Retzeh in the admidah, the first uVIsfilosom is always pronounced usfilosom like the second one –  Raffy Van der Vaart Feb 23 '11 at 10:42
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Re למעינו, same thing with יֶאְשְׁמוּ (in Shabbos morning davening), and other examples where an aleph or an ayin has a sheva nach followed by a letter with sheva na. –  Alex Feb 27 '11 at 15:33

Many, many kids when singing birkat hamazon out loud:

"umeitiv lakol umeichin mazon le'echol b'riotav ..."

G-d feeds us so He can then eat us up?

Instead of:

"umeitiv lakol umeichin mazon l'chol b'riotav ..."

The problem is the standard "benching tune" tends to push this one.

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Perhaps it's my imagination, but I seem to hear people singing v'nahapoch hu (instead of v'nahafoch hu).

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It's not your imagination. It is either their inebriation or their ignorance! –  Yahu Mar 21 '11 at 3:20

Has anybody else noticed that many people attempting to sound "Israeli" or "Sephardi" often pronounce a Kametz as a Pata*h even when it is supposed to be pronounced as a Kametz Katon?

Worst examples are: "Kal" instead of "Kol" - I mean, come on, couldn't they at least pronounce it like Ashkenazim and say "Kawl"?

"Karban" instead of "Korban" - I have not heard many people make this mistake, but I have heard it a handful of times. It makes me cringe.

"Le'Avdecha" instead of "Le'Ovdecha". :(

"Kadshecha" instead of "Kodshecha". This one actually makes me want to cry.

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I always cringe when someone replaces the "Ve" ("and"/flip to future) before a verb with the "Va" ("and"/flip to past) they're expecting.

One example of something similar: In Havdala (words are from Esther, but ba'alei keriya are less likely to make this mistake), saying "... vesasson vayekar" instead of "... vesasson vikar."

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Isaac, check out my examples, some of which are just that. –  Yahu Feb 24 '11 at 6:21
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Or vice versa. One that throws me off if I'm not paying attention is וְיאמְרוּ בַגּויִם ה' מָלָךְ, since most times the word is וַיּאמְרוּ. –  YDK Mar 2 '11 at 0:23

There is another issue is with shva nah, it is commonly incorrectly pronounced in Shma.

Like "behol levovho uvhol nafsheho uvhol meodeho" instead of "uv*e*hol nafsheno uv*e*hol meodeho"

Also it sohuld be "sh*e*ma" instead of "shma"

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jutky, whether it is uvchol or uv'chol is a machlokes and either are acceptable. As for the rest, they're usually pronounced incorrectly by those who move the shva as well, as most who do so create a new syllable. Which way is better, I do not know. Btw, many people use an "h" to transliterate a "ches" which is a throat letter, but I have not seen it done for a "chaf" which is a palate letter. –  YDK Mar 6 '11 at 23:53

Also l'y'rushalayim (instead of lirushalayim) and similar: prefixed vav, kaf, lamed, or bes followed by a yod with a sh'va pronounced as two sh'vas rather than as a chirik.

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Also words with an prefixed bes, kaf, or lamed with a patach (meaning "in the" or the like) pronounced with a sh'va (meaning "in" or the like), like nogea b'davar.

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...and occasionally the opposite, like kav'yachol. –  msh210 Mar 6 '11 at 4:49

ספר ישׁעיה פרק מ פסוּק לא וְקוֹיֵ ד' יַחֲלִיפוּ כֹחַ is often mispronounced as וְקוֹוֵי ד' יַחֲלִיפוּ כֹחַ

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Oh my gosh! I had no idea! –  WAF Apr 5 '11 at 22:19
  • I hear what sounds like hypercorrection of the o-->oy shift in the form of people pronouncing the words אויבים or אויבינו as אובים or אובינו.

  • "Vay'hal'lu" in place of "viy'hal'lu" in "ויהללו ויברכו את שמך באמת" in the penultimate b'racha of 18.

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There is a phrase in the haftarah rani v' simchi [Zech. 3:7] וְנָתַתִּי לְךָ מַהְלְכִים, בֵּין הָעֹמְדִים הָאֵלֶּה (MAHL'CHIM) that for a couple of years in a row I have heard MEHALCHIM. Though I daven where they lein from klaf, so I don't know if that counts.

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Yeshivish types are trending from a-doinoi to a-dunoi to a-deenoi.

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What about Shkoiach versus Yiyashar kochacho

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well shkoiach is meaningless –  Raffy Van der Vaart Feb 22 '11 at 22:04
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It's by assimilation/reduction, though. –  msh210 Feb 27 '11 at 19:32
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that should be "kochacha", as in "yours" not "his". But yes, I;m bugged by that one... –  AviD May 13 '11 at 0:03

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