Take the 2-minute tour ×
Mi Yodeya is a question and answer site for those who base their lives on Jewish law and tradition and anyone interested in learning more. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In Parshas Vayishlach, there is a verse (Genesis 35:22) that contains a "Piska Be'emtza Pasuk": a new paragraph in the Torah scroll begins in the middle of the verse. However, unlike with other examples of this phenomenon (e.g. Numbers 25:19), there are two versions of the trup (cantillation marks) given simulataneously, depending on whether the verse is read as one verse or two separate verses.

וַיְהִ֗י בִּשְׁכֹּ֤ן יִשְׂרָאֵל֙ בָּאָ֣רֶץ הַהִ֔וא וַיֵּ֣לֶךְ רְאוּבֵ֗֔ן וַיִּשְׁכַּ֕ב֙ אֶת־בִּלְהָ֖ה֙ פִּילֶ֣גֶשׁ אָבִ֑֔יו וַיִּשְׁמַ֖ע יִשְׂרָאֵֽ֑ל וַיִּֽהְי֥וּ בְנֵֽי־יַעֲקֹ֖ב שְׁנֵ֥ים עָשָֽׂר

The other places we have multiple note-choices printed per word are in the Decalogue, and we are assisted in teasing apart the טעם העליון and טעם התחתון (upper notes and lower notes) by handy printings in the back of the Chumash.

When leining this, we are supposed to (I think) make it a single pasuk. Indeed, there are homiletical interpretations given for why this ought to be a single pasuk. In that case, I can see four possibilities for how to read it, given that the trup for the words ראובן and וישכב appear to be interchangable:

1:

וַיְהִ֗י בִּשְׁכֹּ֤ן יִשְׂרָאֵל֙ בָּאָ֣רֶץ הַהִ֔וא וַיֵּ֣לֶךְ רְאוּבֵ֗ן וַיִּשְׁכַּ֕ב אֶת־בִּלְהָה֙ פִּילֶ֣גֶשׁ אָבִ֔יו וַיִּשְׁמַ֖ע יִשְׂרָאֵ֑ל וַיִּֽהְי֥וּ בְנֵֽי־יַעֲקֹ֖ב שְׁנֵ֥ים עָשָֽׂר

2:

וַיְהִ֗י בִּשְׁכֹּ֤ן יִשְׂרָאֵל֙ בָּאָ֣רֶץ הַהִ֔וא וַיֵּ֣לֶךְ רְאוּבֵ֗ן וַיִּשְׁכַּב֙ אֶת־בִּלְהָה֙ פִּילֶ֣גֶשׁ אָבִ֔יו וַיִּשְׁמַ֖ע יִשְׂרָאֵ֑ל וַיִּֽהְי֥וּ בְנֵֽי־יַעֲקֹ֖ב שְׁנֵ֥ים עָשָֽׂר

3:

וַיְהִ֗י בִּשְׁכֹּ֤ן יִשְׂרָאֵל֙ בָּאָ֣רֶץ הַהִ֔וא וַיֵּ֣לֶךְ רְאוּבֵ֔ן וַיִּשְׁכַּ֕ב אֶת־בִּלְהָה֙ פִּילֶ֣גֶשׁ אָבִ֔יו וַיִּשְׁמַ֖ע יִשְׂרָאֵ֑ל וַיִּֽהְי֥וּ בְנֵֽי־יַעֲקֹ֖ב שְׁנֵ֥ים עָשָֽׂר

4:

וַיְהִ֗י בִּשְׁכֹּ֤ן יִשְׂרָאֵל֙ בָּאָ֣רֶץ הַהִ֔וא וַיֵּ֣לֶךְ רְאוּבֵ֔ן וַיִּשְׁכַּב֙ אֶת־בִּלְהָה֙ פִּילֶ֣גֶשׁ אָבִ֔יו וַיִּשְׁמַ֖ע יִשְׂרָאֵ֑ל וַיִּֽהְי֥וּ בְנֵֽי־יַעֲקֹ֖ב שְׁנֵ֥ים עָשָֽׂר

always keeping in mind that if you use a note for the one-verse leining version, the other printed note must still be able to work properly for the two-verse version. That consideration forces, for example, the word אביו to have a Zakef-Katon and the word בלהה to have a Pashta.

What are the proper notes to use here?

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers

I am pretty sure that this depends on which minhag you hold to. The question is easiest answered if you hold a standard Ashkenazi minhag, as you can hear it read by an expert Hazzan here. A friend who trained to be a Hazan at YU told me that this was a resource his instructors gave him.

share|improve this answer
1  
The correct link is: bible.ort.org/books/… –  Yosef Dec 27 '10 at 23:06
    
Corrected the problem. –  Rabbi Michael Tzadok Dec 28 '10 at 0:30
1  
OK, that was interesting. The Baal Koreh in the recording leins it as two separate pesukim, with the words in question as "וַיֵּ֣לֶךְ רְאוּבֵ֗ן וַיִּשְׁכַּ֕ב" which would imply, by process of elimination, that if one were to read it as one pasuk, it should be option #4 above. –  Yosef Dec 28 '10 at 2:59
add comment

Sefardim (at least Moroccans) read it first one way, then go back and read it the other way. (I run a Sefardic Minyan on Shabbat).

share|improve this answer
    
Cool! How do they divide it, and which do they do first? –  Yosef Jan 2 '11 at 12:12
add comment

Mechon-Mamre chooses option #2. Links: Public reading // Private reading.

Minchas Shai chooses option #2: http://hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=14036&st=&pgnum=21 , bottom of first column.

Additional discussion here: http://www.ottmall.com/mj_ht_arch/v30/index.html#VEZ and here: http://parsha.blogspot.com/2005/12/parshat-vayishlachthe-taam-elyon-and.html

The consensus in these sources is that, at least for Ashkenazic practice, the one-long-verse version is used for the public reading.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.