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It has been said that the Torah is not a history book and her words are succinct. In addition to the "obvious" people and stories/events discussed in scripture, there are many others mentioned if only by name. Has Judaism ever considered the possibility that there were other great, G-d fearing people (or important events) who/which were not mentioned, even in passing, in the Torah and for what reason?

For example, is it possible that Abraham's neighbor, "Tzvi", three tents down, approached, equaled or excelled Abraham's greatness but was not mentioned, for whatever was G-d's reason, in the Torah? Obviously the Torah considers Moshe to be the greatest prophet ever. Is there, however, any evidence for or against the possibility that there existed during biblical times Torah-true prophets or leaders (or events) that Hashem did not elaborate upon in His torah? Put into another context, which Torah giants of the 19th and 20th centuries will be venerated 100 years from now? It is unlikely that they all will be remembered to the same degree. Some might be mentioned only in passing. Many will be forgotten. To sum up, Did the same thing happen in the Torah?

For purposes of this question, I am limiting reference only to the Tenakh, not "rejected" works such as pseudepigraphic, apocryphic and Dead Sea scrolls.

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Thanks @DoubleAA. The last two "unknowns" on the list is exactly where I was going with this. –  JJLL Jul 28 at 2:43
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There are many instances in Tana"ch where anonymous people are referenced, yet they were often considered great "righteous" people in some way. Eliezer is mentioned "in passing" - I think his name is mentioned once. But, his name is noever mentioned in the main story when he is seeking a wife for Yitzhak. In Shoftim, in the "pilegesh B'Giv'ah" story, the man who took the traveler into his home (did a "righteous" act) is never mentioned by name, either. Just some examples. –  DanF Jul 28 at 14:57
    
@DanF. Thanks for the examples. I am seeking persons and events that were never once mentioned in scripture but may have been documented elsewhere or inferred otherwise. –  JJLL Jul 28 at 22:08

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The gemara in Megila 14a says there were many many more neviim than the 48 men and 7 ladies we have recorded in tanach. But we only have record of the ones who's nevuos were needed for future generations.

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Why "ladies" but not "gentlemen"? –  Double AA Jul 28 at 16:53
    
@user6591. Thank you for your answer. Are you aware of any sources that provide further elaboration on who these prophets and prophetesses were and what their prophesies were? In your opinion does Megila 14a imply the same holds true for events and stories that were not mentioned in the Torah? –  JJLL Jul 28 at 22:22
    
I would assume so. Every prophet had a prophecy concerning something. Whether an event or an action, personal or communal. Its quite possible some were momentous. But not in a historic sense. –  user6591 Jul 29 at 1:56
    
Rav Soloveitchik wrote that Judaism revels anonymity. How many of the Anshei Knesses Hagdolah are famous? We know the names of only a handful of them. I think our focus on making them historic undermines their true greatness of having been a rung in the ladder of the broader world. Its something our egocentric minds don't want to admit is greatness. I've heard a few reports of Reb Moshe Feinstein giving a eulogy along the lines of 'this man was such a great talmid chacham that Hashem didn't let him become famous so he can sit and learn'. –  user6591 Jul 29 at 2:00

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