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Is there any reason that we couldn't believe in life on another planet somewhere? Is there any source that indicates to the contrary?

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Highly –  Fred Jul 24 '14 at 23:54
I realize you are asking for proof of negation, but I will just mention that in the book Thinking aloud, Rav Soloveitchik is recorded as saying alien life is definitely possible and that there may even be an Am Hanivchor for that planet! –  user6591 Jul 25 '14 at 1:58
@Fred My question could really be taken as a subset of that question. But I don't think it's a dupe. –  yEz Jul 25 '14 at 3:09
Why doesn't the reference to the Sefer HaIkkarim stated there satisfy this question? –  Yishai Jul 25 '14 at 13:21
I believe the Lubovitcher Rebbe said that bieng that Torah does not say otherwise it is certainly possible. But that there definatly is no Am Hanivchor for that planet. –  mroll Jul 25 '14 at 13:55

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The Sefer Hikrim brings his rebbe which held that there are no aliens. However the Sefer Hikrim himself argues and holds that there are aliens. He brings a proof from the possuk in Shoftim which says "oro mroz", which the gamera in Moed Katan (Rashi brings this) says roz is a star, and the passuk concludes "arur yoshveha" cursed are its inhabitants, clearly there is some form of life in space.

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Do you know where in Sefer HaIkkrim this is said? –  Yishai Aug 12 '14 at 23:31
Do we have any reason to think י.ש.ב. must apply to live things? –  Double AA Aug 13 '14 at 0:07
More important (to me as the OP) is did his Rebbe have any source or indication? –  yEz Aug 13 '14 at 0:38
how is this a reason that we couldn't believe in aliens. –  ray Aug 31 at 16:05
@ray It's not. It's saying that there is no reason why we couldn't believe in aliens. –  Daniel Aug 31 at 17:29

In the linked article, Rabbi Aryeh Kaplan sources and discusses opinions on both sides of the argument, bringing various proofs and questions.

Chasdai Crescas says aliens can exist, Yosef Albo said there cannot be any other beings with free will, apparently the only objection with believing in aliens centers around this issue of free will. Rabbi Kaplan also quotes the Seffer HaBris who took the middle road saying they exist, but do not have free will. Rabbi Kaplan goes on to say that the Zohar seems to support belief in extra terrestrial life.

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To say that there cannot be other creations or life existing elsewhere in the universe would be placing a limitation on Hashem, which would be kefira (heresy).

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The question isn't about whether there could be aliens. It's about whether we can believe that there are aliens. Of course God could create aliens just like he could create saber-tooth chickens –  Daniel Sep 22 '14 at 22:43
are you suggesting if the possibility of life existing elsewhere became a reality there might be a prohibition against believing they exist? your comment makes no sense at all –  Dude Sep 24 '14 at 0:03
The question is about believing that aliens exist right now. Not that they could exist at some unknown time in the future. –  Daniel Sep 24 '14 at 0:06
my answer remains the same and is relevant. it will be more apparent when you stop getting hung up on using the word "belief" –  Dude Sep 29 '14 at 2:22
No, it's not relevant. It's a question of what could be vs. what is. You say that God can create aliens. I agree. But maybe he didn't create aliens even though he could –  Daniel Sep 29 '14 at 19:29

protected by Shmuel Brin Aug 20 '14 at 1:40

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