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What bracha do we say on mashed potatoes? Does it matter how mashed etc.?

I am thinking that it will be either Hadoma or Shehakol, and it does depend on how mashed, but these are just wild guesses.

So, do we say that since it lost its form it is Shehakol, or is a mashed potato still a potato and thus Hadoma? Or maybe it depends on how much it is mashed? If it is very mashed, then Shehakol but if it is chunky then Hadoma?

Again, these are all just guesses, so I am looking for authoritative answers backed up with sources.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

According to this site, the bracha is ha'adama, no matter what:

"There are some fruits and vegetables which even after a thorough mashing are recognizable due to their unique texture. The examples I know for sure are bananas, eggplant, and potatoes. Therefore, finely mashed potatoes are nevertheless Ha’adoma."

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If you find a source it will be greatly appreciated. –  user6781 Jul 24 at 0:12
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Halachos of Brachos (pg 406) quotes Rav Shlomo Zalman Auerbach, Rav Sheinburg, and Rav Elyashiv who agree that mashed potatoes are HaAdama. Halacha Brurah 202:25 and Yalkut Yosef 202:22 rule that mashed potatoes are HaAdama. See also Sh"t Yabia Omer 7:29 –  Gershon Gold Jul 24 at 1:28
    
@GershonGold Although if you read what they had to say, it was more like "It really should be shehakol, but everyone makes Ha'adama! So let's figure out how it could be ha'adama" –  YEZ Jul 24 at 3:10
    
My guess is that it has the look of a potato. And since it is the normal thing to eat mashed potatoes maybe it sticks with the bracha. I do not know. If anyone has any ideas please share. –  user6781 Jul 24 at 13:02
    
Wow! This is a "twist" that I've never seen before. If I understand right, it is based on "popular recognition"? If so, why do most people rule that applesauce that has no visible apple chunks is "shehakol"? I think that most people know what applesauce looks like. Babies and geriatrics seem to know :-) –  DanF Jul 24 at 18:25

People I know asked Reb Moshe Feinstein about instant potatoes and he said Ha'adama. His reasoning was that it still lookes like potatoes. Most chassidishe hechsheirim, who print their opinions on the packaging, say to make a shehakol.

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What do you think the reasoning behind the "chassidishe hechsheirim" is? Me personally I never had instant potatoes so I do not know but is instant potatoes mashed and if yes how well? –  user6781 Jul 24 at 12:59
    
Instant is the epitome of mashed! Its dried into flakes and reconstituted with water. No lumps:) The reasoning of the ones who say 'shehakol' is seemingly straight out of the books, see Shulchan Aruch O'ch siman 205 siff 4. See Mishna Berurah there machlokes about tehini, crushed sesame seeds. It focuses around whether crushing a food and changing it's bracha into shehakol is only when you turn it into a drink or also if you turn it into a mushy food. Seems the same issue as here. –  user6591 Jul 24 at 15:21
    
My Rabbi said a few year ago that I think it matters on whether if it is the norm or not. I will try looking for a source. So what is the reasoning for Hadoma? Because according to the post above it did not say anything about if it matters how it looks. –  user6781 Jul 25 at 21:59

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