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I enjoy running on a daily basis, but I’m not sure it’s permitted to run on Shabbat. I run for around 15-60 minutes.

Can you run on shabbat?

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marked as duplicate by Fred, user613, Gemini Man, Shmuel Brin, YEZ Jul 18 at 20:43

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
I agree. How do I close it? –  user5224 Jul 18 at 0:26
    
@fred not a dupe. In fact. The case of excercise, as pointed out in the answers is almost certainly assur because of Refuah. This is almost certainly muttar, as I shall answer if I have a couple minuets. –  Ish Ploni ViKohen Jul 18 at 0:27
    
@IshPloniViKohen Well, I guess it depends if the person is running for exercise. In the vast majority of cases, people who run for 15-60 minutes daily are doing it for exercise. –  Fred Jul 18 at 0:29
    
You could delete your own question if you want, but you may want to hold off since @IshPloniViKohen (and perhaps others) does not think this is a duplicate. –  Fred Jul 18 at 0:31
2  
@user613 Please clarify: Are you running for fun, or are you running for exercise? –  Fred Jul 18 at 0:33

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It depends on the motive:

The Shulchan Aruch OC 301:2 says:

ב. בחורים המתענגים בקפיצתם ומרוצתם מותר וכן לראות כל דבר שמתענגים בו וכן מותר לטייל

My loose translation:

Young people who enjoy running may do so, and also to see something enjoyable. It is also permissible to take a pleasure walk.

See MB there who says it is even muttar lechatchila.

As pointed out in another post, running for exercise is prohibited because of Refuah (healing). (See OC 328).

As always, for practical guidance, be sure to refer to your LOR.

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I'd +1 except for your last sentence. How is training for a race not exercise? You're running for exercise so that you're fit enough to perform well in a race. –  Fred Jul 18 at 1:06
    
@fred the problem is not exercise, but trying to be healthy for its own sake. To try to be fit, as I see it, doesn't fall under the category of Refuah as I see it. But I will edit to reflect the uncertainty of my point. –  Ish Ploni ViKohen Jul 18 at 1:12
    
Do you have a source for your claim that someone's reason for being healthy/fit is halachically relevant? –  Fred Jul 18 at 1:13
    
@fred I do not. I think this misvarah. I hear your point. But I don't look at it as trying to be healthy for xyz, but trying to do xyz, and the means happens to be healthy... –  Ish Ploni ViKohen Jul 18 at 1:17
    
That's an interesting perspective, but - even if you don't have an explicit source - what about the halachic principles prohibiting activities mishum r'fu'a would make you think that that's a legitimate distinction? Because drawing a novel yet arbitrary distinction has no halachic value. –  Fred Jul 18 at 1:26

I have heard that if the exertion is unnecessary for Shabbos and it causes you to break a sweat than it is forbidden and in the category of exercise.

When the shulchan aruch says "bachurim" who enjoy jumping around (kfitzasam) and running - the usual sense of that word is "young boys" - not "young people" which nowadays means under 30 or even under 40! I think he means under bar mitzva (13), and for sure not someone in their late teens or later.

Good Shabbos!

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