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Recently, I spoke to a neighbor who had a 20 year old daughter. I asked the mother if she was dating anyone and she responded that she was "in the parsha". This is a new term to me. I assume the term means that she is shidduch "eligible" or does it mean something else? When did this term originate? Is this becomoing a universally accepted term these days? I must be "out of it" (the terminology AND the parsha, that is...)

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It means s\he's in his\her twenties and is looking to date. I've heard it used in the M.O. \ YU crowd also, but not very often. –  Shmuel Jun 9 at 22:16

2 Answers 2

I hear it exclusively from the Litvish/Yeshivish type crowd, although that doesn't mean it doesn't transfer out over time. It means actively seeking shidduch opportunities - i.e. talking to Shadchanim, going out on dates.

It is probably not earlier than late 20th century, certainly not in common usage, as I remember when I would hear it said differently from people connected to those communities.

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This phrase must have arisen during the past decade. Has it been spurred on by shidduch resumes? –  DanF Jun 9 at 17:21
    
@DanF, I don't know what spurred it on. Then again, I don't know how you determine why any idiom became popular. –  Yishai Jun 9 at 17:25
    
@DanF I think longer than the last decade, but I am not sure if it was used for my own children (first one married about two decades ago). –  sabbahillel Jun 9 at 18:59
    
@sabbahillel - You can find out when her kids will be "in the parsha". I'd be curious WHICH parsha they're in. –  DanF Jun 9 at 19:42
    
@DanF I think that the idiom is based on the idea of a person being "betoras hadavar" when something applies to them. Consider a person being "Betoras chasuna" as an example. I think that there are references of that type when a person is chayav a particular mitzvah. Perhaps like a kohen is "in the parsha of duchening". –  sabbahillel Jun 9 at 19:51

I think that the idiom is based on the idea of a person being "betoras hadavar" when something applies to them. Consider a person being "Betoras chasuna" as an example. I think that there are references of that type when a person is chayav a particular mitzvah. Perhaps like a kohen is "in the parsha of duchening".

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I understand what the term means, but, I'm curious of the source of even the expression "betoras hadavar". I've never heard of this term. Still has me curious of how this would become "in the parsha" and who started this "trend". –  DanF Jun 9 at 20:23

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