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In my artscroll machzor it mentioned that there are those who have a custom not to eat any sort of roasted meat on Pesach so that we not be confused and think that we are actually eating the korban Pesach, which was roasted. Does the same custom exist for Pesach Sheni; meaning is there a custom to refrain from eating roasted meat on Pesach Sheni for fear of confusion with the actual korban which was brought on Pesach Sheni by those who weren't able to bring it on Pesach rishon?

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I am curious too if such a custom exists. I have never heard of any. –  Codes with Hammer May 14 at 13:39

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Rasash Pesachim 53a writes that if a community's custom is not to eat roasted meat on the evening of 15 Iyar for the same reason it is not eaten on the night of Pesach, then they should not eat it. He writes that even in a community which doesn't have this custom, eating a full roasted lamb in the manner of the Korban Pesach would remain prohibited as that is not a location-based custom. Kaf HaChaim 476:1 mentions this.

Minchas Chinuch 7:3 disagrees and says the prohibition on eating the full roasted lamb is only for the real Pesach as that is when most people brought the sacrifice, however on Pesach Sheni when only a minority did so there is no such prohibition.

Rabbi Efraim Greenblatt Zatzal in Rivivos Efraim 2:138 quotes Rabbi Ovadya Yosef Zatzal in Chazon Ovadya (unable to find) and says there is no reason to prohibit eating roasted meat on the eve following Pesach Sheni.

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Ok. But the reason there is no such prohibition on 10 Cheshvan is because no one ever developed such a custom. So you can give me all the reasons you want why Pesach Sheni might be excluded, but NONE of them prove it is so unless you document the existence of a custom or a lack thereof. –  Double AA May 14 at 16:19
    
@DoubleAA: The Rasash and Kaf HaChaim disagree with you, and say that there is a reason to prohibit it. Although I do not know anyone who does so today it would not surprise me if there are some exalted individuals that maintain this custom. –  Gershon Gold May 14 at 16:22
    
??? They do not disagree with me. The Rashash even says we don't have this Minhag so it is not forbidden. The fact that he gave a reason why others may have this Minhag doesn't disagree with me. You in fact misquoted the Rashash in this answer. –  Double AA May 14 at 16:28

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