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Using the notes in my Siddurs to direct my prayers, I am trying to figure out exactly what to pray, what is required, what is not permissible, etc., when praying solo. There is not always the right answer for the question I have.

Is there any primer on praying alone that would answer the large variety of questions I might have about praying alone?

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What siddur are you using? Some siddurim probably do a fine job. –  Double AA May 5 at 20:31
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I find that the Art Scroll Siddur as well as Rabbi Sacks' Koren siddur do a good job. –  sabbahillel May 5 at 20:58
    
@DoubleAA. I am actually using both listed here by (Artscroll and Koren). it may be best for me to ask about specifics if there is not a primer. –  Yochanan Michael May 5 at 21:23
    
@sabbahillel see my last comment. –  Yochanan Michael May 5 at 21:24
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I've heard good things about the book "To Pray As A Jew." –  Tatpurusha May 5 at 22:01

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Take a look at this page. This is the summary:

In conclusion, you do not recite:

  1. Kaddish.

  2. Barchu.

  3. The additional prayers recited during the chazzan's repetition of the amidah.

  4. G d's attributes of mercy.

  5. Any of the prayers that are associated with the reading of the Torah.

Other than the above mentioned prayers, you can recite everything which is recited when praying as part of a congregation.

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Although the kedusha before shma (kedushas yotsair) can be said alone. This opinion is not universal and should be said with the chazan. In other words the chazan should stop before it. Even people praying with minyan should be aware of this. –  preferred May 6 at 17:19
    
This also applies to the kedusha of 'uvo lzion'. –  preferred May 6 at 17:20
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@DoubleAA you don't recite Hallel without a minyan. Between Rosh Chodesh, chagim, chol hamoed, and Chanukah this comes up around 50 days a year, so I thought it worth a mention. –  Monica Cellio May 6 at 19:27
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@Monica I am not aware of such a general rule. I have heard of skipping hallel when alone on days where only half hallel is recited. –  Double AA May 6 at 19:29
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@DoubleAA thanks, interesting. The minyan where I mostly go skips hallel (either type) if there's no minyan and I thought that was the rule, but I've never looked for a source. –  Monica Cellio May 6 at 19:38

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