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Are there any issurim involved in organizing a photo album on Shabbat? Sources would be great if possible.

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It sounds like you are asking about arranging printed photos on different pages? How are the prints held in place? – Avrohom Yitzchok May 1 '14 at 14:45
It sounds like you are asking for Psak. This would make it off-topic for us. However, if you want to know the parameters of Borer, and what kind of selecting and sorting are problematic (using examples like socks in a drawer, photos in an album, cards/pieces in a board game, etc.), it can be re-written to that effect. – Seth J May 1 '14 at 15:29
@SethJ, you assume that someone knows that Borer is the likely problem. I think the question can be read as just asking what there is to worry about. – Yishai May 1 '14 at 17:22
@Yishai, on what other basis would someone worry about a problem? The OP must have some reason to be asking the question. 'Uvdah DeHol? Muktzeh? In any case, it does appear like a Psak question. I was giving a suggestion to improve it and make it on-topic. – Seth J May 1 '14 at 17:26

1 Answer 1

The big question is borer and it is a machloket (debate) whether it applies to large objects.

The Aruch HaShulchan Siman 319:8-9 holds that sorting large objects like clothes and silverware is not an issue of borer and completely permitted.

The Shmirat Shabbat kHilchata disagrees and prohibits sorting large objects. (for example see Chapter 3 Borer-89)

Pictures that you don't frame are probably a kli shemelachto lheter, an object whose function is permitted, and you can move them for a permitted function, to protect them or for the space they are occupying. As such, the muktze discussion doesn't really apply. Incredibly valuable pictures (where you put them in frames and designate a place for them and would refrain from moving them), might be muktze machmat chesron kis). See Shulchan Aruch, the beginning of Siman 308, for a definition of muktze machmat chesron kis.

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