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I would like to use my barbecue for dairy, I was told that some poskim hold you can kasher a bbq buy leaving it on high for a couple of minutes. Does anybody know Poskim who hold like this?

In other words, does Libun require the utensil to actually become "white-hot", or is just heating it up with a fire enough?

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The Mishna Berurah( 451) (quoting the Chassam Sofer) writes that the minhag is not to kasher from meat to dairy. More importantly, the grill needs to be thoroughly cleaned before kashering. With many BBQ grills this is a unrealstic feat as you have to clean the grill surface, grill cover, etc. Finally, libun gamur is assumed by kashrus organizations like OU to be about 900 degrees Fahrenheit, which does not happen by leaving the fire on even for extended periods of time. –  Yoni Apr 30 '14 at 6:24
    
pidyon.com/latest-writings/halacha/9-kashrus/… for practical methodology/timing –  Danno Apr 30 '14 at 10:57
    
Now this could also be more stringent because my experience is from hashgacha (they tend to be more stringent), but from my experience we did Libun Gamor on all grates. Libun Gamor means the it has to turn red from being so hot. Stainless steel thin grates do turn red from blowtorch, but others like cast iron takes a little more ingenuity (we put a bunch of coals on top and lit them while on the ground, then covered with foil for a 2 hour. As for the everything that doesnt touch food, I presume libun kal. All applies if anything is clean though. Cnsult your Orthodox Rav before tho. –  armoose Jun 29 '14 at 9:32
    
Isn't this a case of Hetera Bala'? Shouldn't it just need Hagala? –  Double AA Jun 29 '14 at 13:43
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@Yoni Many non-Ashkenazi groups do not have that minhag. –  Double AA Jun 29 '14 at 13:43

2 Answers 2

I have spoken to Rabbi Yirmiyahu Kaganoff of Neve Yaakov Jersusalem and he told me to leave to BBQ on high with the lid closed for 15 minutes, even if the grate does not get white hot

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I presume this is only if everything is cleaned beforehand right? –  armoose Jun 29 '14 at 9:34
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No, even without cleaning, being that this is essentially libun the fire will burn out any dirt. –  Jewels Jun 29 '14 at 9:45
    
interesting didnt know that. –  armoose Jun 29 '14 at 9:52
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Was this to kasher from meat to dairy or from trief to kosher? –  Double AA Jul 29 '14 at 12:55
    
For grills without covers or grates without grills you can either use a torch, or dig a firepit and build a charcoal fire on top of the grate. –  Yitzchak Jul 29 '14 at 16:39

נוהגים שלא להגעיל כלי חלב לאכול בו בשר או איפכא משום דאתי למטעי. (מג"א סי' תק"ט ס"ק י"א)‏

We customarily refrain from purging dairy utensils in order to eat meat with them (or the opposite), because it can lead to mistakes.

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Welcome to Mi Yodeya! I happen to know what your answer means, but not everyone who visits this site will - care to translate? Also, does everyone accept that minhag? –  yEz Jan 9 at 5:15
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@YeZ The answer is no, not everyone (not even all Ashkenazim) accept that minhag. Moreover we don't know if the OP had a valid reason for circumventing this minhag (many exist). I'm not even sure this answers the question at all which didn't ask if it is permissible to do libun but rather how libun would be done. –  Double AA Jan 9 at 5:43
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Note also that the question was about libun and this discusses hag'ala. I recall being told it's different (and note that people who won't kasher pots back and forth will kasher their ovens back and forth, though there may a priori be other considerations there that apply specially to ovens). cc @YeZ –  msh210 Jan 9 at 6:18

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