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Before I begin my question I need to explain specifically what and how rennet is made. Rennet are enzymes scraped from the stomach of an animal, and is used to help give cheese it's texture. So my first assumption was "it's assur because of basar vchalav and non kosher if it's not from a kosher animal." However when I looked at the specifics my mind was thinking otherwise. I found that it can't be basar vchalav or non kosher because it's not an ochel by itself. And it's only used as an additive for texture and not flavoring. That being said, is there a problem eating non kosher-certified cheese other than gevinas akum? If not, what prevents us from using animal rennet in kosher cheese?

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Where did you find that it can't be non kosher? –  Double AA Mar 12 at 13:10
    
It is customary to use calf's rennet, or in some cases, sheep and goat, as those are the animals which provide milk for the cheese; this info comes from my non-shomer kashrut relatives. –  Noach mi Frankfurt Mar 12 at 13:15
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Your title seems different than your question. In the title you are questioning rennet, and in the question you are questioning cheese. –  Gershon Gold Mar 12 at 14:12
    

1 Answer 1

The prohibition of eating "Non Kosher cheese" is called "Gevinas Akum". This has nothing to do with Kashrus. Even if all the ingredients are Kosher 100%, one may not eat cheese made by a non Jew due to Gevinas Akum.

See Rabbi Jachter for a complete explanation.

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I figured the only problem was gevinas akum. However that wasn't my question, my question was assuming the cheese is NOT gevinas akum. –  David Feigen Mar 14 at 11:45
    
@DavidFeigen Where did you assume that in the question? –  Double AA Mar 19 at 18:22

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