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Can a ceramic pot which I used for cooking milk, very rarely and a long time ago, be turned into a parve pot to boil water only?

The pot is actually granitware, constructed of low-carbon steel with glass coating. I would like to use it to boil water for tea, mostly. May I use this water to add to chicken soup?

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What are you going to do with this water? –  Double AA Jan 2 at 20:29
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Ariane, welcome to Mi Yodeya, and thanks for bringing your question here! Please note that the site makes no guarantee of validity, and does not offer professional (particularly rabbinic) advice: treat information from this site like it came from a crowd of your friends. Might I recommend you register your account? That will give you access to more of the site's features. –  msh210 Jan 2 at 20:46
    
The pot is actually granitware, constructed of low carbon steel with glass coating. I would like to use it to boil water for tea, mostly. May I use this water to add to chicken soup ? Thank you, Ariane –  Ariane Jan 2 at 21:38

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The general rule is that ceramic dishes cannot be koshered. If they are thickly glazed they may be koshered through not using them for at least 12 months. Unglazed ones cannot be koshered at all. The same should apply when changing the kosher typology (basari to parve, for example). Kashering dishes - Chinaware

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But when changing "typology" there are issues of nat bar nat which could lead to extra leniencies, particularly when it has been 12 months. –  Double AA Jan 2 at 20:58
    
There are also rabbinical decrees in changing the "typology" of utensils which go beyond normal "non-kosher to kosher." The poskim were worried that if you constantly changed the "typology" of your dishes, it would lead to mix-ups, and they therefore discouraged or perhaps prohibited it unless it was a great need. –  YEZ Feb 2 at 1:37

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