Take the 2-minute tour ×
Mi Yodeya is a question and answer site for those who base their lives on Jewish law and tradition and anyone interested in learning more. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Recently, the OU decided to certify quinoa for Pesach. Formerly, the OU held by the view of Rav Yisroel Belsky that quinoa is kitniyot, or at least that Rav Belsky's view created sufficient doubt to justify being machmir.

This question is not specifically about quinoa, but about the general phenomenon of disagreements between poskim. In general, if someone asks a shailah from a rav and receives an answer, they should hold by the teshuva they receive and should not ask again from another rav (unless they disclose the previous ruling). Moreover, if someone has adopted a chumra they may require hatarat nedarim in order to give it up [Kitzur Shulchan Aruch 67:7].

So, using quinoa as a case study, in which of the following settings is a person (a) bound to the stricter opinion (b) bound to the stricter opinion, but with the possibility of doing hatarat nedarim to switch to the lenient opinion (c) able to switch to the lenient opinion without any problems?

  1. A person asked a shailah from Rav Belsky and was told that quinoa is kitniyot.
  2. A person asked a shailah from their rav and was told, "We hold in accordance with Rav Belsky that quinoa is kitniyot."
  3. A person is a member of a community that declared, "We hold in accordance with Rav Belsky that quinoa is kitniyot."
  4. A person declared, "I hold like the OU that quinoa is kitniyot."
  5. A person declared, "I hold like the OU that there is a doubt as to whether quinoa is kitniyot."
share|improve this question
    
Do you intend 'I hold ' to be a place holder for 'I vow to hold '? –  avi Dec 22 '13 at 22:29
    
@avi no, the vagueness is somewhat intentional; I'm trying to find out exactly what constitutes "binding acceptance" of psak. The Kitzur says that for a chumra, if you do it three times without specifying "bli neder", that's acceptance. However this definition only makes sense for positive observances, not negative ones. –  Shivaram Lingamneni Dec 22 '13 at 22:46

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.