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I sometimes hear mention of certain days being called a "hidden yom tov." Examples include Rosh Chodesh, Hoshana Rabba and Erev Yom Kippur.

I have a few questions related to this:

  • What does it mean that a day is a hidden yom tov, and what is the purpose?
  • What is the source of this concept, and how do we know what days these are?
  • What are all of the days that we know are hidden yamim tovim, and might there be additional days that we don't know about?
  • Will there come a time when hidden yamim tovim are "revealed"? What will be different then?
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"might there be additional days that we don't know about?" Of course. They're just hidden. –  Double AA Nov 6 '13 at 23:31
    
In all of my learning, I must admit that I have never heard of this concept, at least not how it is being expressed here. I would like to help, but it is difficult unless you can share an example of where you heard this phrase, from whom you heard, the context in which you heard, etc. Also, did you hear it in English, Yiddish, or Hebrew? After obtaining some more information, it may become easier to answer you question. Kol tuv. –  Maimonist Nov 7 '13 at 4:59
    
related? judaism.stackexchange.com/a/10733/759 –  Double AA Nov 7 '13 at 8:40
    
English. The linked question above is a great example of this. I've also encountered this term applied to Purim and Lag BaOmer. Here is another example of the term being used: revach.net/tefila/article.php?id=4098 –  Aaron Nov 7 '13 at 20:13
    
Aaron, I know that this does not exactly answer to question, which, by the way, is a good one. But in another context of "hidden," I have heard that the Book of Esther was almost not canonized into the Jewish Tenach because Hashem's name was never mentioned. Some hold, as I have heard, that Purim was initiated as a rabbinical decreed Holy Day because the hand of G-d was always present throughout the story of Esther but was not obvious. One might say, Hashem was "hidden" as many hold today. That is to say that the era of great miracles is long over and G-d works in secrecy. –  JJLL Nov 8 '13 at 0:57

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