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What needs to be considered to show that under a grave marker lies a Jewish person?

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Interesting question, Aule; thanks for bringing it to Mi Yodeya. Welcome! Please consider registering your account, which will give you access to more of the site's features. – msh210 Nov 4 '13 at 7:01
    
Aule, the NY Times just report that Heinrich Mueller, "one of the prime architects of the holocaust" may be buried in a Jewish cemetery in Berlin. nytimes.com/2013/11/01/world/europe/…. Some claim that Elvis Presley added a Star-of-David ti his mother's (or was it his grandmother's) tombstone after supposedly finding Jewish routes. So, I'm thinking that neither burial in a Jewish cemetery or a tombstone with Jewish images is a guarantee of a Jewish person be buried there. – JJLL Nov 6 '13 at 1:50
    
To not ti and roots not routes sorry – JJLL Nov 6 '13 at 1:56
    
If the grave is on the Olive Mount, it is assumed to certainly be a Jew, with enough certainty to marry within the most orthodox circles. (However, several women of royal Danish family are buried there too.) – Adám Jan 30 '14 at 20:13
    
This is interesting. However it's common in America that someone who may have only a Jewish father or converted not according to halacha could end up being buried in a Jewish cemetary (I know real cases...) So I'm not sure if it would ever be a proof... – Yehoshua Apr 24 at 23:54

This very much depends on who you want to accept it. For some authorities a Magen David or a Hebrew inscription (especially ת.נ.צ.ב.ה) may be enough, but for others the gravestone alone is not sufficient, and other proof may be required (for example, being buried in a Jewish graveyard). For the Rabbanut in Israel a photo of a gravestone with a Magen David is usually not considered sufficient proof on its own, and they may insist on going through conversion before accepting someone as Jewish if that is the only proof that exists.

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