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How come delicatessen offer meat sandwiches AND cheesecakes as deserts? Were people mixing meat & dairy in eastern european communities ? Or were they not really part of traditional ashkenazi food ?

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Or they just combined two separate dishes into one non-kosher. –  Shmuel Brin Sep 15 '13 at 19:20

1 Answer 1

Just because something is called a "delicatessen" and serves traditional Eastern European fare does not mean that the restaurant and its food conforms to the ritual and dietary standards of Kosher laws. Under these laws, meat and dairy are consumed separately and a restaurant, if it wanted to have rabbinical supervision, would have to serve one or the other.

Do you have a particular restaurant in mind? Those with reputable and accepted external supervising agencies would sell EITHER traditional meat dishes (the corned beef on rye, the kishke, the stuffed cabbage etc) or traditional dairy dishes (blintzes). These foods are traditional to Eastern Europe and may also be found at non-kosher restaurants that cater to people interested in that food.

Here are a couple of websites that might provide other information for your learning:

Info about supervision http://www.myjewishlearning.com/ask_the_expert/at/Ask_the_Expert_Hashgacha.shtml

and here is a wikipedia page which gives some good information about kosher vs. kosher style

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kosher_restaurant

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Re "Those with reputable and accepted external supervising agencies would sell EITHER traditional meat dishes (the corned beef on rye, the kishke, the stuffed cabbage etc) or traditional dairy dishes (blintzes).": yes and no. A single store can serve both from separate kitchens in separate eating areas. I've never seen that, but a store in town here serves meat dishes restaurant-style and sells homemade (dairy) pizza, raw, made separately from the meat dishes. –  msh210 Sep 16 '13 at 2:45
    
@msh210 Yes, I have been to restaurants which serve one set of food and the have a store attached and sell the other ingredients. There have also been hubbubs about places that sell both, and give separate disposable trays, thus allowing individuals to make their own cheeseburgers etc IN the restaurant. But a single restaurant with a reputable hashgacha won't have on its menu both sets of food served from the same kitchen and like that. –  Danno Sep 16 '13 at 11:08
    
@Danno thanks for the answer ! I guess I was curious about what were the habits in those communities when they still lived in Eastern Europe. I'm a sepharadic jew and I live in Paris where there are several "delicatessen" who serve both. They don't claim to be strictly kosher, so it's fine, but I still find it surprising as it seems "traditional" nonetheless. Generally, when it's traditional it's a bit religious. Maybe they only ate cheesecake after fish dishes ! –  Emmanuel Sep 16 '13 at 20:51

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