Sign up ×
Mi Yodeya is a question and answer site for those who base their lives on Jewish law and tradition and anyone interested in learning more. It's 100% free, no registration required.

We know that a chasson is not permitted to do work during his Sheva Brachos. Two reasons: Either because he must spend the time bringing joy to his wife or because he is compared to a king and a king doesn't work (See Evan HaEzer Siman 64.)

I once heard there is a discussion in the poskim if a kallah is not allowed to work. Although seemingly according to the 2 reasons stated above this wouldn't apply to a kallah still I'm curious to know if the poskim discuss this in any way and give reasoning for either side. In particular I've heard there is a Maharsham about this.

share|improve this question
Is the claim that kings don't work apply to all of the time or only when they are "just married?" – JJLL Aug 6 at 23:50

1 Answer 1

The Maharsham (vol. 3 ch. 206) writes:

ובדין הכלה תוך ז״י המשחה ומלאכתה לחפור בגדים אם מותר לה לתפור בביתה הדבר פשוט לענ״ד שאם בעלה מסכים לזה אין חשש כלל דמצות התורה הוא על החתן שישמח אשתו וגם בזה יש דיעות דמהני מחילתה

And regarding the case of a bride within the seven days of festivity, whose job is sewing clothing, addressing the issue of whether it is permitted for her to sew in her home, it is clear, according to my humble opinion, that if her husband agrees to this, then there is nothing to worry about whatsoever. For the biblical commandment is specifically incumbent upon the groom to please his wife [and not vice-versa]. And even here there are opinions that [her] forgoing this right would be effective [in freeing the groom from his responsibilities] (trans. my own).

To summarize, the Maharsham combines two elements to reach the point of "no problem whatsoever": agreement of husband, and lack of obligation in the first place (for brides).

See also (first paragraph under Background) and (footnote 17)

share|improve this answer
Note that in surveying the sources in these two articles, it seems that the earliest sources make no mention of any prohibition for the bride. – mevaqesh Aug 6 at 8:19

Your Answer


By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.